Feb 16, 2020  
2016-2017 Chesapeake College Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Chesapeake College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 152+ - Microcomputer Operating Systems

    3 credits
    An examination of the operation, installation and configuration of PC system software and hardware. Students will have considerable hands-on experience using, installing, supporting, and maintaining various system software and PC hardware. Areas of study will include DOS and Windows XX operating systems. [FALL/SPRING] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    CIS 109 .
    Note: CyberWatch curriculum equivalent: CW130.
  
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    CIS 154+ - Microsoft Windows Server

    3 credits
    Explores the planning, installation, configuration, administration, troubleshooting, and securing of Microsoft’s Windows Server operating system. This course is taught in a combination lecture and hands-on format and prepares students for one of the Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP) exams required for the Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator (MCSA) and/or Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer (MCSE) certifications. [SPRING] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 152+ .
    Note: CyberWatch curriculum equivalent: CW230.
  
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    CIS 155 - Computer Hardware

    3 Credits
    An examination of the hardware, networking, cloud computing, and virtualization concepts found in the Comp TIA A+ 1001/current version exam. Students will have hands-on/online simulation activities using, installing, supporting, and maintaining various system hardware and software. Topics will include the (5) domains in the CompTIA A+ 1001/current version exam.  SPRING Two hours lecture, two hours lab per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 109  
  
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    CIS 226+ - Project Management

    3 credits
    Course focuses on the project management process.  Topics will include development for Web Media and the project team as key to the successful achievement of Web site and social media project goals. The class examines the main elements required in every proposal/plan: time frame and budget. Key areas of digital presentations and web development project team’s responsibility are examined and practiced. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s):

    ENG 101+  Prereq/Corequisite:
    MAT 023  or appropriate placement score.


  
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    CIS 228+ - Social Media & Web Development Strategies

    3 credits
    Course focuses on mastery of social media strategy, organizational development, measurement, and analytics.  Students will review web development techniques such as log files, cookies, web bugs, and paper tagging. Topics include: User Experience, Search Engine Optimization, Analytics, Accessibility, Social Media, and the Mobile Web. Students work on real world case studies to learn and practice skills that can be applied in any profession that works with social media or websites. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 109  ; ENG 101+  Prereq/Corequisite:
    MAT 023  or appropriate placement score.
  
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    CIS 240+ - Data Communications

    3 credits
    An introduction to networking using concepts and techniques of teleprocessing network technology. Topics include: point-to-point communication systems, multi-user systems, local and wide area networks, satellite systems, digital networks, and network protocols. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 152+ .
  
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    CIS 245+ - Network Administration

    3 credits
    A study of local area network administration. Course work will provide a working knowledge of network technology and management with an emphasis on local area networks. It includes simulation of real work experiences managing and monitoring networks. [SPRING] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 240.
  
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    CIS 254+ - Linux – Use, Configuration & Administration

    3 credits
    Combines operating systems concepts and hands-on practice on how to install, configure, use, and administer the Linux operating system. Topics include the basic elements of the UNIX and Linux operating systems, using the shell, managing processes and file systems, systems administration and security, and shell programming. [FALL] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 152+ .
  
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    CIS 256+ - Systems Analysis and Design

    3 credits
    A study of the methods of analysis and design. The student will use data-processing concepts, hardware, and methodologies to complete systems analysis and design of a new system for a hypothetical data processing problem. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 109 .
  
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    CIS 260+ - Computer User Support

    3 credits
    A course designed for the entry-level user support specialist. Topics include customer service skills, working as a team, troubleshooting computer problems, common support problems, “Help Desk” operations, user needs analysis and assessment, and user support management. [SPRING] Two hour lecture; two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 152+ .
  
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    CIS 267+ - Security +

    3 credits
    This course offers in-depth coverage of the current risks and threats to an organization’s data, combined with a structured way of addressing the safeguarding of these critical electronic assets. The course provides a foundation for those responsible for protecting network services, devices, traffic, and data; and addresses the broad-based knowledge necessary to prepare students for further study in other specialized security fields. It is also intended to serve the needs of individuals seeking to pass the Computing Technology Industry Association’s (CompTIA) Security + certification exam. [SPRING] Two hours of lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 240+  or CSI 157 (to be taken at Anne Arundel Community College).
    Note: CyberWatch curriculum equivalent: CW 160.
  
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    CIS 269+ - Hardening the Infrastructure

    4 credits
    This course provides network administrators with an awareness of security-related issues and the essential skills they need to implement security in a given network. The course addresses protective security technologies in today’s enterprise environments: TCP packet analysis, OS hardening, router security, firewall systems, Intrusion Detection/Prevention Systems, virus protection, Virtual Private Networks (VPNs), and disaster recovery. [FALL] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 267+ 
    Note: CyberWatch curriculum equivalent: CW 225.
  
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    CIS 270+ - Ethics for the Information Age

    3 credits
    A study of ethics and moral philosophy as a means for providing a framework for ethically grounded decision-making in the information age. Issues will be considered from the point-of-view of multiple ethical theories, giving students the opportunity to think critically about the issues and draw their own conclusions. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 109 .
    Note: CyberWatch curriculum equivalent: CW 110.
  
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    CIS 278+ - Network Defense and Countermeasures

    3 credits
    This course focuses on understanding the architecture for network defense. Topics include network attacks and defenses, firewall systems, design, and configuration, VPN configuration, intrusion signatures, and network security policies and configurations. [SPRING] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 267+ .
    Note: CyberWatch curriculum equivalent: CW 235.

Criminal Justice

  
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    CMJ 101 - Introduction to Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice

    3 credits
    A survey of the past and present state of law enforcement and its development with added stress on its role in the future. Special emphasis is placed on civil rights, human relations, professionalism, prevention of crime, and constitutional limitations on the administration of criminal justice. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
  
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    CMJ 105 - Introduction to Corrections

    3 credits
    An examination of the total correctional process from law enforcement through administration of justice, probation, prisons, and correctional institutions and parole history and philosophy. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 108 - Law Enforcement Administration

    3 credits
    An examination of the organization, personnel, management, and administration of law enforcement agencies. Emphasis is placed on training operations and services. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 111 - Police Operations

    3 credits
    A practical study of the line activities of a police department with special emphasis on the patrol function. Topics include: routine patrol procedures, report writing and processing, field interviews and note-taking, preliminary investigations, and special operational procedures. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 131 - Community Corrections

    3 credits
    An examination of community corrections programs. Topics include: the history of community corrections, appropriate client types, and types of available facilities. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 191 - Criminology

    3 credits
    An introduction to deviant behavior and current criminological theories with emphasis on synthesis and police applications, and includes the prevention of crime and the phenomena of crime. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 201 - Current Problems in Criminal Justice

    3 credits
    An examination of emergent problems in the entire field of law enforcement, criminal justice, and delinquency. Areas of interest will include organized crime, police community relations, and anti-police organizations. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 211 - Techniques of Criminal Investigation

    3 credits
    An introduction to basic techniques for the criminal investigator in law enforcement, with stress on modern methods necessary in the light of judicial decisions of the last decade. Special emphasis is placed on the details of conduct and direction of criminal inquiries. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 213 - Principles of Criminal Law

    3 credits


    The sources of criminal law with emphasis on the Constitutional limitations of state action in criminal offenses, as well as the substantive elements of major criminal offenses and the defenses thereto. A case method approach is used in developing the subject matter of the course. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

    This course is also offered as PLG 213.

  
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    CMJ 214 - Criminal Evidence and Procedures

    3 credits


    Constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure, post-conviction treatment, origin, development, philosophy, constitutional basis of evidence, kinds and degrees of evidence and rules governing admissibility; judicial decisions interpreting individual rights and case studies. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

    This course is also offered as PLG 214.

  
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    CMJ 215 - Juvenile Justice

    3 credits
    A survey of the development of the problem of juvenile delinquency and its treatment. Special emphasis is on the actual operation of juvenile justice in the State of Maryland and the role of the individual. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 216 - Introduction to Forensic Science

    3 credits
    An examination of the evidence collection function of a law enforcement agency. Methods of locating, collecting, processing, and preserving evidence and equipment utilization will also be discussed. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 217 - Crime Scene Processing

    3 credits
    Focus is on advanced forensic/crime scene investigation. Topics will include question documents, forensic photography, forensic psychology, and forensic pathology. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 220 - Ethics in Criminal Justice

    3 credits
    A survey of basic principles relating to the standards for ethical behavior that guide criminal justice professionals in different roles and responsibilities. The aim is to make ethical decisions based on informed personal and accepted professional standards. Rules, laws, and codes of conduct are explored as a foundation for discussing individual ethical responsibilities.  [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    CMJ 231 - Correctional Law

    3 credits
    A survey of law as it relates to corrections. Topics will include statutory and administrative laws, and court decisions relating to those laws regarding prisoners’ rights. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Drafting

  
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    DFT 101 - Fundamentals of Drafting/CAD

    3 credits
    This course is designed to provide students with the basic technical drafting skills necessary to function in a CAD (Computer-Aided Design) drafting environment. During the extent of this course, the student will learn about the history of hand drafting and the differences/similarities to the drafting methodologies of the CAD tools used today. Basic understanding of various layout, view, and projection methods, as well as basic dimensioning and tolerancing will be addressed. Students will explore different engineering practices in order to broaden their base of understanding of the fields available to them for employment. A basic introduction to CAD will be presented and used to prepare a variety of basic drawings. [FALL] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    DFT 104 - Blueprint Reading

    3 credits
    The interpretation and reading of blueprints and plans for both the manufacturing and construction industries. Students learn to read detail and assembly drawings, welding drawings, and architectural plans. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    DFT 121+ - Technical Drafting

    3 credits
    An introduction to manufacturing practices and working drawings for mechanical devices. Detail and assembly drawings will be prepared in this course in manual form and basic computeraided design applications. [SPRING] One hour lecture, four hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): DFT 101 .

Early Childhood Development

  
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    ECD 101 - Introduction to Early Childhood Education

    3 credits
    An introduction to the field of Early Childhood Education. It provides a conceptual framework for understanding the early childhood profession, the role of the early childhood educator, and early childhood programs. It examines the historical philosophies and theories of Early Childhood Education as well as the current trends, issues, and practices of educating children from birth through the age of eight. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week and five hours of field experience over the duration of the course.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    ECD 105 - School-Age Group Child Care

    3 credits
    An introduction to the field of school-age child care. Both curriculum development and basic child development for the schoolage child will be included. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    ECD 121+ - Infant Development and Care

    3 credits
    An introduction to the field of infant child care in a family care setting or a group care setting. Study of the child’s growth and development from conception to age three, with an emphasis on the factors affecting human development and behavioral traits. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    ECD 101  or ECD 160 .
  
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    ECD 160 - Child Development and Behavior

    3 credits
    A study of the conceptual framework for understanding the cognitive, emotional, social, and physical development of children from birth through late childhood. Together, ECD 160 and ECD 163+  meet the 90 hours of approved training for senior staff members required by the Office of Child Care of the Maryland State Department of Education. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week and 15 hours of field experience over the duration of the course.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    ECD 161+ - Guidance and Counseling in Early Childhood Education

    3 credits
    A study encompassing the rationale and techniques of counseling and parent involvement i n early childhood programs. Observation and recording techniques as they relate to guidance and program development will be discussed. Observation and laboratory contact with children will be required i n addition to regular classroom sessions and preparation. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    ECD 160 .
  
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    ECD 163+ - Early Childhood Methods and Materials

    3 credits
    A study of the design and implementation of developmentally appropriate curriculum for children from three to eight years of age. Emphasis will be placed on language/literacy development, mathematics, science, and the arts. Consideration will be given to researching and comparing Early Childhood Curricula and designing an appropriate environment for learning. Together, ECD 160  and ECD 163 meet the 90 hours of approved training for senior staff members required by the Office of Child Care of the Maryland State Department of Education. [SPRING] Three lecture hours per week and 15 hours of field experience over the duration of the course.
    Prerequisite(s): ECD 160 .
  
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    ECD 165+ - Children with Special Needs in Early Childhood

    3 credits
    A study of young children with special needs in a general education setting. This course will familiarize the student with the various types of special needs, assessment tools, assessment techniques, program skills and curriculum designs, types of programs, and parental concerns associated with young children who have handicaps and disabilities in a general education setting. Observational methods and basic developmental trends will be stressed. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week and 15 hours of field experience over the duration of the course.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    ECD 160 .
  
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    ECD 171+ - Child Care Center Management

    3 credits
    A study of management practices and the administrative function of child care center directors. Topics include licensing regulations, facility operation and management, budget and bookkeeping, recordkeeping, and design of job descriptions, selection and evaluation of staff, communications systems for families and staff, planning and inventory of equipment and supplies, and recruitment of volunteers. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ECD 101  or ECD 163+ .ECD 160 
  
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    ECD 180+ - Health, Safety, & Nutrition in Early Childhood Education

    3 credits
    This course examines health, safety, and nutritional needs of young children, ages two to six, in child care center settings and family child care settings. The focus will be on general health considerations (mental as well as physical), communicable diseases, prevention techniques in health and safety, hygiene education, safety practices, and planning nutritional meals and snacks. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ECD 160 .
  
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    ECD 270+ - Practicum in Early Childhood Development

    3 credits
    This program provides field experience either at the Early Childhood Development Center on the Wye Mills campus, or at another approved child care center. The practicum will provide first-hand experience for planning and implementation of activities for groups of pre-school children. [SPRING] One hour lecture, nine hours practicum experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ECD 163+  and current certification in First Aid/Infant and Child CPR.

Economics

  
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    ECN 171 - Principles of Macroeconomics

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A study of the principles of economic behavior and its application to economic problems. The emphasis is on macroeconomic principles. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    ECN 172+ - Principles of Microeconomics

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A continued study of the principles of economic behavior and their application to economic problems. The emphasis is on microeconomic principles. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.  RECOMMENDED ECN 171 . Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Education

  
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    EDU 101+ - Foundations of Education

    3 credits
    An introduction to the teaching profession and the World of education. This course examines the historical, philosophical, psychological, and sociological foundations of American education. The purposes, structure, and impact of schools, as well as teaching methodology, curriculum, and the teaching profession are discussed in relation to students, parents, and society. Career opportunities, latest ideas, methods, and legal interpretations in the field of education are also investigated. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours of lecture per week and a minimum of 15 hours of field experience are required.
    Prerequisite(s): Take  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores, or a current Teaching Certificate.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    EDU 210 - Introduction to Special Education

    3 credits
    An introduction to federal and state regulations governing special education in a general educational setting. Emphasis is upon understanding learning and physical differences as identified by the federal government, as well as models used for the delivery of services.  The identification process, support systems, modification techniques and parental roles are accentuated. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week and a minimum of 15 hours of field experience are required.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    EDU 214+ - Processes and Acquisition of Reading

    3 credits
    A study of the process of language development. This course is designed to assist pre-service and in-service teachers in understanding the reading acquisition process through observation and analysis of reading and written language development, and the study of current issues in reading research. The course is organized around current, accepted, research-based theoretical models that account for individual differences in reading. Introduction to language structures including spoken syllables, phonemes, graphemes, and morphemes is included in this course. Participants will apply knowledge of the core areas of language to reading acquisition in terms of first and second language acquisition, typical development and exceptionalities. Participants will be introduced to current scientific research. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101+ ; PSC 150 ; appropriate scores on placement tests or current Teaching Certificate.
  
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    EDU 215+ - Instruction in Reading

    3 credits
    An examination of approaches to reading instruction. This course is designed to give the classroom teacher the ability to use a representative array of research-based instructional techniques and strategies in the area of reading. Instructional routines and strategies in the five major components of reading instruction (phonological and phonemic awareness; phonics, spelling and word study; fluency development; vocabulary; and comprehension) suitable for various age and ability groups are emphasized. Throughout the course, students will demonstrate their skill with the instructional routines and strategies by role-play, live demonstrations, critiquing good and inadequate models, and reviewing the research support available for those approaches. [AS NEEDED] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor’s degree.
  
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    EDU 216+ - Materials for Teaching Reading

    3 credits
    A course designed for elementary pre-service and in-service teachers. Participants will use criteria consistent with findings of scientific research to select, evaluate, and compare instructional programs and materials for teaching reading. Successful students will be proficient in enabling students to become strategic, fluent, and independent readers using a variety of texts and other materials. They will be prepared to involve parents and members of the school and surrounding community to promote reading both inside and outside of school. [AS NEEDED] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor’s degree.
  
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    EDU 217+ - Assessment for Reading Instruction

    3 credits
    A course designed to assist pre-service and in-service teachers in becoming proficient consumers and users of classroom-based assessments and assessment data. Instruction will focus on building knowledge of the purposes of assessment, types of assessment tools, how to administer and use several valid, reliable, well-researched formal and informal assessments of reading and related skills, how to effectively interpret the results of assessments, and how to communicate assessment results in a variety of contexts. Participants will show that they can use assessment data to guide instructional decisions. Participants will demonstrate their abilities by selecting, administering, and/or interpreting assessments appropriate for screening, progress monitoring, diagnosing, and outcome measurement. [AS NEEDED] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor’s degree.
  
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    EDU 218+ - Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part I

    3 credits
    Designed primarily for secondary content areas, this course provides in-service teachers with an understanding of the essentials of reading processes necessary for secondary students to become proficient readers. Participants gain an understanding following five areas: purposes and types of reading, methods of assessing reading, strategies and skills in reading, student-centered reading instruction, and affective dimensions of reading. [AS NEEDED] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor’s degree.
  
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    EDU 219+ - Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part II

    3 credits
    Designed for secondary teachers in all content areas, this course expands on Part 1, focusing on types of reading, skills in reading, and instruction. The emphasis will be on teaching secondary students to learn from text. Participants will formulate research questions, complete a literature review, and implement and evaluate a coherent literacy plan. Participants will also implement reading and writing strategies that promote student mastery of subject area content. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): EDU 218+ , or formal documentation of a current teaching position from a school, or approval of the Department Chair, and a Bachelor’s degree.
    Note: Documentation must be presented at the time of registration in order to waive the prerequisite.
  
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    EDU 222+ - Curriculum Development and Teaching Methods

    3 credits
    This course focuses on curriculum development and instructional methods for quality educational programs in Maryland schools. During the course, participants will explore curriculum, develop instructional plans, write performance outcomes, identify appropriate instructional strategies, develop instructional materials and utilize standards-based assessment strategies and examine a variety of proven teaching methods. State and national content standards are used as a basis for curriculum design.  [FALL - AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor’s Degree.  Note:  This course is designed for those seeking MSDE Teaching Certification as a “career changer.”
  
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    EDU 223+ - Student Performance Assessment

    3 credits
    The identification and utilization of appropriate student performance assessments. A variety of assessment instruments will be studied and developed which measure student achievement in the cognitive, psychomotor and affective domains. Topics covered include formative and summative assessments, informal and formal assessments, assessment goals, national and state assessments, student performance criteria, cognitive assessments, performance assessments, student portfolio assessment, student grading systems and instructor evaluation. [SPRING - AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Bachelor’s Degree.  Note:  This course is designed for those seeking MSDE Teaching Certification as a “career changer.”
  
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    EDU 225+ - Facilities Management & Organization for CTE Programs

    3 credits
    A course developing skills needed for organization and managing instruction in Career & Technology Education Programs.  Topics will include:  organization and management of classroom and lab facilities, classroom management, program, and instructor effectiveness, safety laws and procedures, program advisor committee development and effectiveness, student Career & Technology Education organizations, professional organizations, identification of funding sources and classroom safety and effective learning.   This course is specifically for Career and Technology Instructors seeking MSDE Certification. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): :  Must be seeking Career and Technology Certification through MSDE.
  
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    EDU 227+ - Differentiated Learning in Career & Technology Education

    3 credits
    A course focusing on accommodations and resources available to assist instructors who teach individuals with disabilities and those with English as a second language.  Content will include understanding the national and state laws, the IEP Process, making accommodations in the classroom and instructional delivery, and using the Universal Design for Learning to develop differentiated and assessment strategies.  This course is specifically for Career and Technology Instructors seeking MSDE Certification. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Must be seeking Career and Technology Certification through MSDE.
  
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    EDU 235+ - Academic Literacy in Career & Technology Courses

    3 credits
    A course focusing on academic literacy of reading, writing, mathematics, science, technology and engineering, as identified in the Maryland Core State Standards.  The course is designed specifically for Maryland Career and Technology Instructors and meets the MSDE Certification Requirements for Academic Literacy.  Students will produce a curriculum document which shows the Academic Literacy Standards imbedded into their CTE program. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Must be seeking Career and Technology Certification through MSDE.

Electronics Technology

  
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    ETT 110 - Concepts of Electronics

    3 credits
    Introduction to the concepts of basic and intermediate electronics theory. Course content includes DC and AC principles, transistors, diodes, integrated circuits, use of test equipment, and computer concepts and principles. Designed for the non-electronics major. [FALL] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Emergency Medical Services

  
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    EMS 101+ - Fundamentals of Paramedic Practice

    7 credits
    A course presenting the foundations of emergency medical services. Topics include: roles and responsibilities, well-being, illness and injury prevention, role in public health, medical/legal issues, ethics, pathophysiology, patient assessment, airway management, vascular access and medication administration, therapeutic communications, life-span development, communication, and care of the trauma patient. [FALL] Course Fee. Six hours lecture, four hours of laboratory, and eight hours of clinical per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland EMT.
  
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    EMS 105+ - Medical Emergencies

    8 credits
    A study of the major body systems and their relationship to the disease process. Critical thinking skills will be developed in assessment, plan development and implementation of therapeutic interventions as they relate to out-of-hospital patient management. [SPRING] Course Fee. Seven hours of lecture, five hours of laboratory, and eight hours of clinical per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland EMT, EMS 101+ .
  
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    EMS 201+ - EMS - Clinical Experience

    2 credits
    A course to provide actual training experience. The students will provide direct patient care with an Advance Life Support Unit as designated by the Maryland Emergency Medical Services Institute. Supervision will be provided by a designated Clinical Field Instructor. This experience will include patients across the life-span and all aspects of trauma and medical assessment and interventions. [SUMMER] A minimum of 200 hours or 75 calls during the summer session.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland EMT, EMS 105+ .
  
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    EMS 205+ - Special Populations and Operations

    8 credits
    A study of the unique problems occurring across the life-span of populations. Specialized assessment and interventional techniques including: the pregnant population, neonate, pediatric, geriatric, abuse and assault victims and the patient with special health care challenges. [FALL] Course Fee. Seven hours lecture, five hours laboratory, and eight hours clinical per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland EMT, EMS 201+ .

Emergency Medical Technician-Paramedic

  
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    EMT 132 - Emergency Medical Technician

    6 credits
    Covers the theory and techniques of basic emergency medical care. The Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) provides basic life support care to critically ill or injured patients. EMTs work directly with another EMT to provide this level of care and in conjunction with a paramedic to provide advanced life support. EMTs learn to manage an airway using artificial devices, assess the severity of illness or injury, manage wounds and bleeding, immobilize fractures, perform CPR, utilized an automated defibrillator and a host of other procedures. Recent curriculum changes at the national and state level allow EMTs to assist with the administration of some medications. [FALL/SPRING/SUMMER] Four hours lecture and four hours in the lababoratory per week
  
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    EMT 132 - Emergency Medical Technician

    6 credits
    Covers the theory and techniques of basic emergency medical care. The Emergency Medical Technician (EMT) provides basic life support care to critically ill or injured patients. EMTs work directly with another EMT to provide this level of care and in conjunction with a paramedic to provide advanced life support. EMTs learn to manage an airway using artificial devices, assess the severity of illness or injury, manage wounds and bleeding, immobilize fractures, perform CPR, utilized an automated defibrillator and a host of other procedures. Recent curriculum changes at the national and state level allow EMTs to assist with the administration of some medications. [FALL/SPRING/SUMMER] Four hours lecture and 4 hours laboratory per week.
  
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    EMT 133 - Clinical Experience for the EMT

    1 credit
    Clinical course for the Emergency Medical Technician student. It will provide supervised experience at clinical and field internship sites that allow students to practice basic patient assessments and to be exposed to a variety of sick and injured patients while under the direction of qualified instructors. [FALL/SPRING/SUMMER] Minimum of fifteen clinical hours per week.
  
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    EMT 133 - Clinical Experience for the EMT

    1 credit
    Clinical course for the Emergency Medical Technician student.   It will provide supervised experience at clinical and field internship sites that allow students to practice basic patient assessments and to be exposed to a variety of sick and injured patients while under the direction of qualified instructors. [FALL/SPRING/SUMMER] Minimum of fifteen (15) clinical hours per week.

English

  
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    ENG 094+ - PASS English

    0 credit; 3 load hours.
    Program for Accelerated Student Success (PASS) English: A modularized course designed to accelerate students through comprehensive reading and writing instruction to prepare them for the rigors of college-level reading and writing projects. Critical thinking, critical reading, grammar, mechanics, formatting, academic tone, audience awareness, purpose, organization, development, essay structure, and citation are emphasized.  [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Corequisite: Take ENG 093+  as a corequisite (if grammar diagnostic score requires it).
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    ENG 100 - Communicating on the Job

    3 credits
    Instruction in writing and speaking skills necessary to communicate effectively in work situations. Attention will be given to tone, form, and style appropriate to meet the needs of various audiences and to accomplish different purposes on the job. Effective use of evidence, grammatical correctness, and organization of details will be covered. A research project is required, focusing on issues relevant to the student’s specific career program.
      [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
  
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    ENG 101+ - Composition

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    Instruction in the writing process and fundamentals of academic writing. Students will learn to write clearly organized, well supported, thesis-driven essays. Analysis of written works and other texts, research methods and information literacy, and ethical use of resource materials are studied. Students must write a passing research paper to satisfy course requirements. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  or ENG 100  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: ENG 101 must be completed with a minimum grade of “C”.  All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    ENG 102+ - Introduction to Literature

    3 credits
    An introduction to fiction, drama, and poetry, with emphasis on the writing of critical essays. A research paper is required. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101+ .
  
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    ENG 140+ - Literary Journal Production

    1 credit
    Production of the college literary magazine. This course involves students in literary journal production, including a study of the principles of short fiction, poetry, drama, art, and photography, as well as the process of publishing, including selecting material, planning and executing format, defining and maintaining theme, developing design and layout, and editing. [SPRING] One hour lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101+ .
  
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    ENG 183 - African-American Literature in America

    3 credits
    A survey of African-American writings, fiction and nonfiction, and major writers. Discussion will include the oral tradition, slave narratives, the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts Movement, and contemporary African-American writings. [ALTERNATE YEARS - FALL ODD] Three hours lecture per week.
  
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    ENG 188+ - The Short Story

    3 credits
    A study of representative short stories with general emphasis on the main elements of this narrative form. Exploration of themes and ideas, types and styles will be included, with critical analysis of the short stories of well-known authors. [AS NEEDED] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102+ .
  
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    ENG 201+ - English Literature I

    3 credits
    A survey of English literature with attention given to the cultural backgrounds of literary works. Representative examples of Old and Middle English literature, the Renaissance, and the 17th and 18th Centuries are studied including works of Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, and Swift. [FALL] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102+ .
  
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    ENG 202+ - English Literature II

    3 credits
    A survey of English literature with attention given to the cultural backgrounds of literary works. Major writers from the Romantic and Victorian periods, as well as 20th Century are studied, including Wordsworth, Browning, Yeats, Joyce, and Eliot. [SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102+ .
  
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    ENG 205+ - World Literature I

    3 credits
    A survey of the great masterpieces of World literature with emphasis on form, thematic concepts, criticism, and historical periods. Major works from the earliest written records through the 16th Century are studied. [FALL] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102+ .
  
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    ENG 206+ - World Literature II

    3 credits
    A survey of the great masterpieces of world literature with emphasis on form, thematic concepts, criticism, and historical periods. The focus i s on the 16th and 17th Centuries through the modern World. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102+ .
  
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    ENG 207+ - American Literature I

    3 credits
    A survey of American literature following its historical significance with emphasis on thematic concepts. The works from the Colonial period through to the Civil War are studied. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102+ .
  
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    ENG 208+ - American Literature II

    3 credits
    A survey of American literature from the Civil War to the present. The works of Twain, Crane, Faulkner, and other major writers are studied. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 102+ .
  
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    ENG 210+ - Technical Writing

    3 credits
    An introduction to the principles and mechanics of good technical writing in science, industry, and government. Assignments cover the various processes and strategies in effective formal and informal reports and other job package materials, as they relate directly to each student’s field. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101+  .
  
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    ENG 240 - Creative Writing

    3 credits
    A workshop in original composition and revision of prose and poetry. Emphasis is on the individual conference, class consideration of student writing, and the practical problems of the writing of manuscripts. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    ENG 241+ - Grammar and Linguistics

    3 credits
    Advanced study of English grammar, with attention to the language history, cultural implications, and linguistics. The course emphasizes grammatical forms and concepts, sentence structure, punctuation, and syntax. Applications of grammatical theory to the teaching of composition, literature, and ESOL will be covered as well. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ENG 101+ .

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 060+ - English as a Second Language - Basic Reading Skills

    0 credit
    A basic reading skills course designed for non-native speaking students. The course prepares students for academic success in the Intermediate Reading Skills course by focusing on building vocabulary and improving reading comprehension and speed. The course centers on developing students’ reading skills while presenting materials of increasing difficulty. All activities take place in a culturally-sensitive classroom environment. If students are required to register for an ESL reading course, they must enroll in that reading course in their first semester of enrollment. [AS NEEDED] Three hour lecture per week.
    Corequisite: RECOMMENDED ESL 064+ , if applicable placement test score.
  
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    ESL 062+ - English as a Second Language - Intermediate Reading Skills

    0 credit
    An intermediate reading skills course designed for non-native speaking students. The course prepares students for academic success in developmental or college credit courses by increasing their reading skills while presenting materials of increasing difficulty. Building on basic reading skills, the course helps students synthesize, analyze, and evaluate text. All activities take place in a culturally-sensitive classroom environment. If students are required to register for an ESL reading course, they must enroll in that reading course in their first semester of enrollment. [AS NEEDED] Three hour lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ESL 060+ , if applicable placement test score. Corequisite: RECOMMENDED ESL 066+ , if applicable placement test score.
  
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    ESL 064+ - English as a Second Language - Basic Writing Skills

    0 credit
    A basic writing course designed for non-native speaking students. The course introduces students to basic English grammatical and structural forms reflected in simple written assignments. It provides written practice to enable students to create effective paragraphs using standard English. All activities take place in a culturally-sensitive classroom environment. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Corequisite: RECOMMENDED ESL 060+ , if applicable placement test score.
  
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    ESL 066+ - English as a Second Language - Intermediate Writing Skills

    0 credit
    An intermediate writing skills course designed for non-native speaking students. The course prepares students for success with academic writing in developmental or college courses. Students’ writings will include narrative, descriptive, cause/effect, and persuasive essays. Students will learn to recognize and self-correct repeated syntactical errors. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ESL 064+ , if applicable placement test score. Corequisite: RECOMMENDED ESL 062+ , if applicable placement test score.

Film

  
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    FLM 240 - The Art of Film

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to film as artistic communication. Critical viewing and exploration of film techniques are undertaken in areas such as animation, documentation, comedy, drama, propaganda, and social awareness. [FALL] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
  
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    FLM 242 - American Cinema/American Culture

    3 credits
    An explanation of the visual style, narrative tradition, and cultural implications of American film-making. The course probes the deeper meaning of American movies, the hidden messages of genres, the social and psychological effects of Hollywood film style, and the mutual influences of society and popular culture. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Food Service Management

  
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    FSM 101 - Sanitation, Safety, and First Aid

    3 credits
    A study of the techniques and procedures for employing hygienic practices in food service including food sanitation and microbiology, food spoilage and food-borne illnesses, and education and training in sanitation of food service personnel. Basic first aid in the kitchen and industry certification included. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    FSM 102 - Culinary Fundamentals

    3 credits
    This course provides the foundation, fundamental concepts and techniques used in the culinary profession. Students will be given an overview of basic cooking techniques, knife skills, product identification, fabrication, vocabulary and terminology. Other topics include; recipe costing and quantity adjustments, professionalism, and sanitation standards. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    FSM 103 - Food Preparation I

    3 credits
    The study of professional cooking based on a knowledge of ingredients and procedures with an emphasis on classical culinary methods, menu planning and influences on modern American cuisine. [FALL/SPRING] Course Fee. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    FSM 104+ - Food Preparation II

    3 credits
    The study of the fundamentals of baking and the preparation and decoration of entree foods and platters for à la carte and buffet. Also covers the care of baking and other special equipment. [FALL/SPRING] Course Fee. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): FSM 103 .
  
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    FSM 105+ - Advanced Food Preparation

    3 credits
    The study of the principles of food preparation specific to meat, seafood, poultry and game including the identification, inspection, purchasing and storage practices and cooking methods related to each product. Includes Garde Manger. [FALL/SPRING] Course Fee. One hour lecture, four hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): FSM 104+ .
  
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    FSM 270+ - Food Service Management Internship

    3 credits
    Provides field experience for students interested in food service management. The internship provides first-hand experience and assists students in developing skills critical to the food service industry. Students are assigned to local facilities under faculty supervision. [FALL/SPRING] One hour lecture, nine hours practicum experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): FSM 100, FSM 101 , FSM 103 .

Foreign Languages

  
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    FRE 121 - Elementary French I

    3 credits
    An introduction to the French language. Skills in speaking and listening are developed through conversational practice. Elementary reading and writing skills are combined with the study of grammar. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    FRE 122+ - Elementary French II

    3 credits
    A study of the basic structures of French with emphasis on speaking and listening comprehension. Speaking and writing skills are developed. The culture of France is studied through video, audio, and print resources. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): FRE 121 .
  
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    SPA 121 - Elementary Spanish I

    3 credits
    An introduction to the Spanish language. Skills in speaking and listening are developed through conversational practice. Elementary reading and writing skills are combined with the study of grammar. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
  
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    SPA 122+ - Elementary Spanish II

    3 credits
    A study of the basic structures of Spanish with emphasis on speaking skills and listening comprehension. Speaking and writing skills are developed. Spanish culture is studied. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SPA 121 .
  
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    SPA 201+ - Intermediate Spanish I

    3 credits
    A course designed to review, strengthen, and apply the elementary skills covered in SPA 121 and 122.  Continued study of Spanish grammar to include the present, past, and future tenses and the present subjunctive and conditional moods.  There is an increased emphasis on the development of Spanish reading and writing skills as they are applied to literary and cultural topics.  Speaking and listening skills are also developed through participation in a variety of interactive small and large group activities reflecting the normal use of Spanish in various situations.  Students will be continually challenged in this course to communicate better in Spanish.  [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.  SPA 122+ .
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SPA 202+ - Intermediate Spanish II

    3 credits
    A review of Spanish grammar and an introduction to Spanish-language literature and film.  Increased emphasis on speaking, reading, and writing.  [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.  SPA 201+  or equivalent.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
 

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