Feb 26, 2020  
2016-2017 Chesapeake College Catalog 
    
2016-2017 Chesapeake College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Paralegal Studies

  
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    PLG 211+ - Tort Law

    3 credits
    An introduction to the principles of tort law. Intentional torts, negligence, strict liability, causes of action, and defenses are included. An emphasis on the practical skills is maintained. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PLG 101 .
  
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    PLG 213 - Principles of Criminal Law

    3 credits


    The sources of criminal law with emphasis on the Constitutional limitations of state action in criminal offenses, as well as the substantive elements of major criminal offenses and the defenses thereto.  A case method approach is used in developing the subject matter of the course.  [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

    This course is also offered as CMJ 213.

  
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    PLG 214 - Criminal Evidence and Procedures

    3 credits


    Constitutional and procedural considerations affecting arrest, search and seizure, post-conviction treatment, origin, development, philosophy, constitutional basis of evidence, kinds and degrees of evidence and rules governing admissibility; judicial decisions interpreting individual rights and case studies. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

    This course is also offered as CMJ 214.

  
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    PLG 217+ - Real Property Law

    3 credits
    The study of law as it applies to real property.  Rules affecting ownership and transferability of real estate will be covered. The paralegal’s duties, including accumulating data and instruments of conveyance, monitoring mortgage foreclosures, real estate closings and lease preparation, examining title reports, and preparing and plotting legal descriptions of land are covered. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PLG 101 .
  
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    PLG 241 - Family Law

    3 credits
    A broad survey of various areas of domestic law. Topics covered in this course include marriage, annulment, divorce, marital property, child custody, support, and adoption. The preparation of forms involved in these matters and the procedural rules that affect such proceedings are included. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
  
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    PLG 250 - Constitutional Law

    3 credits
    An overview of the history and interpretation of the U.S. Constitution, articles and amendments. The student will explore the three branches of the federal government and the interpretation of the articles that created them, and control their functioning. The course will also examine the individual’s rights in society, the changes in society that impact individual rights, and the Supreme Court decisions interpreting such rights. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Philosophy

  
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    PHL 200 - Introduction to Philosophy

    3 credits
    A survey of Western philosophy from Plato to American thinkers. Questions of life’s meaning and purpose, and the nature of right and wrong, are studied with attention to philosophical methods. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.

Physical Education

  
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    PED 103 - Wellness for Life

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    The introduction of basic concepts and behavioral choices to become fit and promote wellness for life. All aspects of the total person will be covered, with emphasis on achievement of full potential in the physical, mental, emotional, social, environmental, and spiritual aspects of wellness for life. Assessment activities and program design will be emphasized. [FALL/SPRING]
  
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    PED 105 - Integrated Health and Physical Education

    3 credits
    A course providing insight into healthy living, including the structure and function of the human body, its systems, and the importance of physical fitness and sound nutrition. In addition, human movement and physical activity are viewed as central elements to foster active, healthy lifestyles and enhance the quality of life for future students of various educational levels. [SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Note: This course meets General Education Program requirements in the Teacher Education AAT degree only. 
  
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    PED 148 - Weight Training and Physical Fitness

    2 credits
    An introduction to progressive resistance exercise. Emphasis is on weight training and flexibility. [FALL/SPRING] One hour lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    PED 149+ - Advanced Weight Training and Physical Fitness

    2 credits
    An advanced approach to weight training utilizing free weights, universal gym, and exercises. Emphasis is on individual program development and evaluation, including a pre- and post-flexibility phase. [AS NEEDED] One hour lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PED 148 .
  
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    PED 202 - Introduction to Exercise Science

    3 credits
    Introduces the student to the exercise science discipline. This course examines concepts including professionalism, ethics, certification and licensure, employment opportunities and scientific foundations of the various sub-disciplines. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    PED 204 - Injury Prevention/Emergency Management

    3 credits
    Basic first aid and emergency concepts (CPR), as well as prevention, recognition, treatment and management of injuries and physical disabilities that effect exercise. Initial and follow-up care are studied, along with the influence of training and program design on adaptions associated with diseases, functional disabilities and injuries that affect strengthening techniques. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    PED 207 - Introduction to the Sports Industry

    3 credits
    Introduces current or future sport managers with an overview of the sport management discipline. The introduction is focused on the history of the sport management discipline, career opportunities, and various sport and exercise settings, such as interscholastic, intercollegiate, international, and professional sport, along with the health/fitness and recreation industries. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    PED 209 - Sport: A Cross-Cultural Perspective

    3 credits
    Explores the significance of sport and human movement from an anthropological perspective. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Physical Therapist Assistant

  
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    PTA 101+ - Introduction to Physical Therapist Assisting

    3 credits
    An introduction to the profession of physical therapy including the purpose, history and practice structures. The scope of practice, ethics and roles of the healthcare providers are included. Basic patient care procedures and documentation are taught. [FALL] Course Fee. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the PTA Program.
  
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    PTA 102+ - Physical Therapist Assistant I (Basic Techniques)

    6 credits
    Introductory study of the theory and skill development in body mechanics, gait training and data collection techniques. Emphasis is on competence in postural measurements, transfers, range of motion, manual muscle testing, basic therapeutic exercise, assistive devices and massage. The course covers disease processes and specific medical conditions seen in physical therapy. [SPRING] Course Fee. Three hours lecture, six hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 101+ , BIO 211+ , MAT 113+ , ENG 101+ , PSC 150 . Corequisite: PTA 106+ .
  
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    PTA 104+ - Physical Therapist Assistant II (Modalities)

    6 credits
    Introduces theory regarding the concepts of pain, peripheral vascular disease and wound care. Includes theory and skill-development in modalities and relaxation techniques with expected competency in specific units. [SUMMER] Course Fee. Five hours lecture, ten hours laboratory over nine weeks.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 102+ , PTA 106+ , BIO 212+ . Corequisite: PTA 105+ .
  
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    PTA 105+ - Clinical Practice I

    2 credits
    Preparation and performance of a concentrated clinical experience in a selected physical therapy setting for supervised application of clinical skills. PTA skills are assessed by clinical and academic faculty. [SUMMER] Course Fee. Fifteen hours lecture/assessment of PTA skills and 75 hours of clinical experience over nine weeks.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 102+ , PTA 106+ , BIO 212+ . Corequisite: PTA 104+ .
  
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    PTA 106+ - Kinesiology

    6 credits
    The study of biomechanic principles involved in human movement. Includes structure and functions of joints and muscle groups and characteristics of normal posture and gait. Pathologies basic to each specific joint are reviewed. [SPRING] Course Fee. Four-and-one-half hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 101+ , BIO 211+ , MAT 113+ , ENG 101+ , PSC 150 . Corequisite: PTA 102+ .
  
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    PTA 150+ - Functional Anatomy for the Physical Therapist Assistant

    1 credit
    This course is designed to bridge content and learning from human anatomy and physiology coursework to kinesiology coursework. Students will participate in both hands-on learning activities and interactive Internet links to promote basic knowledge of bone, muscle, and joint anatomy and physiology. From that knowledge, students will develop an understanding of how anatomy and physiology relate to function. [FALL] Course Fee. Two hours lecture and 28 hours of laboratory over eight weeks.
    Corequisite: PTA 101+ .
  
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    PTA 201+ - Physical Therapist Assistant III (Orthopedics)

    4 credits
    Theory of orthopedic conditions and their underlying pathology. Skill-development includes integrated rehabilitation techniques of these conditions. [FALL] Course Fee. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 104+ , PTA 105+ , PSC 250+ . Corequisite: PTA 202+ , PTA 203+ .
  
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    PTA 202+ - Physical Therapist Assistant IV (Rehabilitation)

    4 credits
    Theory and pathology of conditions which may require usually long-term rehabilitation techniques. Skill-development focuses on techniques which enhance the level of function. [FALL] Course Fee. Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 104+ , PTA 105+ , PSC 250+ . Corequisite: PTA 201+ , PTA 203+ .
  
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    PTA 203+ - Clinical Practice II

    4 credits
    A supervised clinical experience in a selected physical therapy setting for the application of new and previously learned clinical skills and theoretical integration. [FALL] Course Fee. A total of 185 clinical hours per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 104+ , PTA 105+ , PSC 250+ . Corequisite: PTA 201+ , PTA 202+ .
  
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    PTA 204+ - Physical Therapist Assistant V (Neurodevelopmental)

    3 credits
    Theory and pathology of the neurologically-involved patient. Special emphasis on skill-development in neurodevelopmental techniques. [SPRING] Course Fee. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 201+ , PTA 202+ , PTA 203+ . Corequisite: PTA 205+ , PTA 206+ .
  
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    PTA 205+ - Current Issues and Trends Affecting the Physical Therapist Assistant

    1 credit
    A seminar course which addresses current issues and trends specific to the profession of physical therapy including healthcare reform, reimbursement, licensure and medical ethics. [SPRING] One hour lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 201+ , PTA 202+ , PTA 203+ . Corequisite: PTA 204+ PTA 206+ , PTA 207+ .
  
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    PTA 206+ - Clinical Practice III

    4 credits
    A supervised clinical experience in a selected physical therapy setting for application of new and previously learned clinical skills. Includes implementation of management skills and teaching techniques. [SPRING] Course Fee. A total of 144 hours of clinical practice per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 201+ , PTA 202+ , PTA 203+ . Corequisite: PTA 204+ , PTA 205+ .
  
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    PTA 207+ - Clinical Practice IV

    4 credits
    A supervised full-time clinical experience in a selected physical therapy setting for application of new and previously learned clinical skills and procedures. Includes implementation of management skills and teaching techniques. [SPRING] Course Fee. A total of 226 hours of clinical practice per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): PTA 204+ , PTA 206+ . Corequisite: PTA 205+ .
    Note: A grade of “C” or better in each PTA course is required to progress into PTA 207.

Physics

  
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    PHY 205+ - College Physics I

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    Algebra-based study of the laws of physics. This course provides the first of two semesters of college physics. Topics include vectors, motion, force, equilibrium, momentum and energy, properties of matter, mechanical waves and sound, and an introduction to kinetic theory and thermodynamics. [FALL] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score; MAT 115+ .
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    PHY 206+ - College Physics II

    4 credits
    Second semester of algebra-based college physics. Topics include electricity, magnetism, light and optics, and an introduction to atomic, nuclear, and modern physics. [SPRING] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 205+ .
  
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    PHY 215+ - Physics I

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A calculus-based study of the laws of physics. The first of two semesters of college physics, preparing students for further study in the physical sciences for education and engineering. Topics include kinematics, statics and dynamics, momentum and energy, rotational dynamics, mechanical waves and sound, gravitational field, properties of materials, and an introduction to fluid mechanics and thermodynamics. [FALL] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score; MAT 140+ .
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    PHY 216+ - Physics II

    4 credits
    Second semester of calculus-based college physics. Topics include electric forces, potentials and fields, DC/AC circuits and components, magnetic forces and fields, electromagnetic induction and radiation, light and optics, atomic and nuclear models, and an introduction to quantum and modern physics. [SPRING] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 215+ .

Political Science

  
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    POL 180 - U.S. Federal Government

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A study of the basic principles of the national government of the United States, its structure and powers, and the operations of Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court. Citizenship, elections, political parties, and pressure groups are studied. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    POL 181 - State and Local Government

    3 credits
    An introduction to the organization and operation of state government and its subdivisions. Emphasis is placed on the functions of the various agencies and branches of Maryland government. POL 181 may be taken before POL 180 . [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    POL 185 - African-American Politics in the United States

    3 credits
    An overview of African-American leadership, as well as a comprehensive analysis of the socio-economic factors that shape African-American politics in the United States. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Psychology

  
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    PSC 150 - General Psychology

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to the scientific study of psychology with emphasis on learning, cognition, motivation and emotion, individual differences, and adjustment patterns. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
  
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    PSC 201+ - Introduction to Counseling

    3 credits
    An examination of the basic techniques and theories used in counseling. Areas of study will include interviewing skills, information giving, and crisis handling. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PSC 150  .
  
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    PSC 211+ - Advanced Counseling

    3 credits
    An in-depth study of theories and techniques used in counseling. Areas of study will include counseling special populations, the role of the counselor and the use of self in the counseling process. A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the human organism. Emphasis is given to the various stages of the life span, and the developmental influence of social class, the family, the school, and the group. [SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PSC 201+ .
  
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    PSC 220+ - Educational Psychology

    3 credits
    A study of psychological research and theory related to the educational process. This course focuses on the learning process and related concepts, including individual differences, measurement and evaluation, adjustment, motivation and human development. Attention is given to various instructional models and objectives, theories of learning, and the application of modern psychological principles as they apply to educational theory and process. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week and a minimum of 15 hours of field experience are required.
    Prerequisite(s): PSC 150 .
  
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    PSC 250+ - Human Growth and Development

    3 credits
    A study of the physical, intellectual, emotional, and social development of the human organism. Emphasis is given to the various stages of the life-span, and the developmental influence of social class, the family, the school, and the group. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PSC 150 .
  
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    PSC 255+ - Abnormal Psychology

    3 credits
    A study of major aspects of deviant behavior including psychoneurosis, psychosis, personality disorders, and mental health. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PSC 150 .
  
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    PSC 265+ - Family Counseling

    3 credits
    An examination of the interactional processes observed in families and the theories advanced to explain them. Areas of study will include family systems, dysfunctional families, psychodynamic and behavioral techniques as well as short- and long-term intervention. [ALTERNATE YEARS] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PSC 201+ .
  
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    PSC 266 - Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs

    3 credits
    This course examines the effects of psychoactive drugs on the functionality of the brain and body. Drug classification, including their action potential, withdrawal syndromes, and associated medical problems will be discussed. Assessment and treatment modalities will be reviewed. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
  
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    PSC 267+ - Ethical Issues in Counseling

    3 credits
    An in-depth study of ethical issues in counseling when providing services to clients.  Topics include an emphasis on the examination of legal and ethical codes and professional standards, analysis of ethical dilemmas in practice, and consequences of ethical violations in the various areas of human services and addiction. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all developmental requirements; PSC 150 
  
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    PSC 268+ - Addiction Treatment Delivery

    3 credits
    A detailed exploration of treatment delivery when working with clients with substance use disorders.  Topics include screening, intake completion, orientation to services, case management, crisis intervention, education and prevention, client referral, consultation, reports and record keeping, assessment and diagnosis, and treatment planning. [FALL] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of all developmental requirements. Prereq/Corequisite:
    PSC 150 

Radiologic Sciences

  
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    RSR 102+ - Introduction to Radiologic Sciences

    1 credit
    An introduction to the radiologic sciences. Topics to be studied will include a history of radiography; a discussion of different medical imaging modalities; medical ethics and law; professionalism; and the structure and environment of healthcare systems. RSR 102 is offered in the eight-week summer session. [SUMMER] Three hours lecture and discussion per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Radiologic Sciences Program.
  
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    RSR 105+ - Introduction to Positioning

    2 credits
    An introduction to radiographic procedures. Radiographic terminology, finite anatomy, equipment manipulation, positioning, effective communication skills, patient care considerations, radiation exposure factors, and radiation protection procedures used to accurately demonstrate patient anatomy on a radiograph will be studied. Procedures will be demonstrated. Students will practice procedures in role-playing lab situations and complete lab examinations for each procedure studied. Thirty-five hours of orientation is required prior to the start of the semester. Three hours per week will be scheduled in the clinical setting. RSR 105 is offered in the eight-week summer session. [SUMMER] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Radiologic Sciences Program.
  
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    RSR 107+ - Radiographic Patient Care

    3 credits
    A study and practice of the skills necessary to provide supportive care for pediatric, adult, and geriatric patients who are having medical imaging procedures performed. Studies will include vital signs, oxygen administration, venipuncture, body mechanics, patient assessment skills, care of patients in trauma and critical situations, universal precautions, basic pharmacology, drug administration, performance of ECG’s, patient education, and customer service techniques. RSR 107 is offered in the eight-week summer session. [SUMMER] Course Fee. Four hours lecture and discussion, four hours lab per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Radiologic Sciences Program.
  
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    RSR 111+ - Positioning I

    4 credits
    A continuing study of radiographic procedures. Radiographic terminology, finite anatomy, equipment manipulation, positioning, effective communication skills, patient care considerations, radiation exposure factors, and the radiation protection procedures used to accurately demonstrate patient anatomy on a radiograph will be studied. Procedures will be demonstrated. Students will practice procedures in role-playing lab situations and complete lab examinations for each procedure studied. [FALL] Three hours lecture, three hours lab per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 105+ .
  
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    RSR 117+ - Fundamentals of Radiographic Exposure

    3 credits
    An introduction to radiographic exposure. Topics to be studied will include a discussion of atomic structure, nature of radiation, x-ray production, factors that influence x-ray beam characteristics, interactions of photons with matter, beam filtration, analog imaging, image characteristics of detail, distortion, density and contrast and the factors that influence them; control of scatter radiation, determination of exposure factors, image receptors, and the difference between analog and digital imaging. [FALL] Three hours lecture and one hour lab per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 102+ .
  
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    RSR 121+ - Clinical Radiography I

    2 credits
    Supervised clinical rotation to observe and practice radiography. Orientation to the radiograpic information systems and equipment at each site will be completed. The student will position patients for radiographic procedures, communicate effectively, provide patient care, calculate appropriate exposure factors, and provide radiation protection as appropriate under the direct supervision of a registered radiographer in the clinical setting. Initial practice of radiographic procedures will be completed in the laboratory and lab examinations will be completed. Progress will be assessed and documented throughout the semester. Course coordinates with RSR 111+ - Positioning I . [FALL] Course Fee. Twenty-four contact hours of clinical and laboratory practice per week as needed to demonstrate competency.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 105+ .
  
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    RSR 126+ - Positioning II

    4 credits
    A continuing study of radiographic procedures. Radiographic terminology, finite anatomy, equipment manipulation, positioning, effective communication skills, patient care considerations, radiation exposure factors, and the radiation protection procedures used to accurately demonstrate patient anatomy on a radiograph will be studied. Procedures will be demonstrated. Students will practice procedures in role-playing lab situations and complete lab examinations for each procedure studied. [SPRING] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 111+ .
  
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    RSR 132+ - Radiographic Imaging Equipment

    4 credits
    A study of the physical principles and equipment of radiography. Electricity, magnetism, electromagnetism, radiographic circuits, fluoroscopic equipment, mobile x-ray units, linear tomography, and quality control processes will be studied. [SPRING] Four hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 117+  and MAT 113+ .
  
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    RSR 136+ - Clinical Radiography II

    2 credits
    Supervised clinical rotation to observe and practice radiography. The student will continue to position patients for radiographic procedures, communicate effectively, provide patient care, calculate appropriate exposure factors, and provide radiation protection as appropriate under the direct supervision of a registered radiographer in the clinical setting. Practice of radiographic procedures will be completed in the laboratory and lab examinations will be completed. Clinical progress will be assessed and documented throughout the semester. Course coordinates with RSR 126+ - Positioning II . Thirty-five hours of clinical orientation will be required prior to the start of the semester. [SPRING] Course Fee. Twenty-four hours of practice per week as needed to demonstrate competency.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 121+ .
  
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    RSR 140+ - Positioning III

    2 credits
    A continuing study of radiographic procedures. Radiographic terminology, finite anatomy, equipment manipulation, positioning, effective communication skills, patient care considerations, radiation exposure factors, and radiation protection procedures used to accurately demonstrate patient anatomy on a radiograph will be studied. Procedures will be demonstrated. Students will practice procedures in role-playing lab situations and complete lab examinations for each procedure studied. RSR 140 is offered in the eight-week summer session. [SUMMER] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 126+ .
  
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    RSR 146+ - Clinical Radiography III

    1 credit
    Supervised clinical rotation to observe and practice radiography. The student will continue to position patients for radiographic procedures, communicate effectively, provide patient care, calculate appropriate exposure factors, and provide radiation protection as appropriate under the direct supervision of a registered radiographer in the clinical setting. Clinical progress will be assessed and documented throughout the semester. Course coordinates with RSR 140+ - Positioning III . Thirty-Five hours of clinical orientation will be required prior to the start of the semester. RSR 146 is offered in the summer session. [SUMMER] Course Fee. Twenty-four hours of clinical per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 136+ .
  
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    RSR 203+ - Positioning IV

    4 credits
    A continuing study of radiographic procedures. Radiographic terminology, finite anatomy, equipment manipulation, positioning, effective communication skills, patient care considerations, radiation exposure factors, and the radiation protection procedures used to accurately demonstrate patient anatomy on a radiograph will be studied. Procedures will be demonstrated. Students will practice procedures in role-playing lab situations and complete lab examinations for each procedure studied. [FALL] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 140+ .
  
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    RSR 206+ - Digital Radiography

    3 credits
    A study of computers, digital image acquisition and display. The components, principles, and operation of computers and digital imaging systems will be studied. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system and quality assurance and maintenance are discussed. The principles of computed tomography are also presented. [FALL] Course Fee. Three hours lecture, one hour lab per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 132+ .
  
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    RSR 217+ - Radiographic Pathology

    2 credits
    A survey of radiographic pathology. Discussion of terms, disease classifications, etiologies, the radiographic appearance of selected diseases, and the impact of disease on radiographic exposure selection will be presented. A survey of common radiographic pathologies of the skeletal system, gastrointestinal system and related organs, urinary system, reproductive system, respiratory system, endocrine, nervous, and circulatory system will be included. [SPRING] Two hours lecture, one hour laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 212+ , RSR 203+ .
  
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    RSR 221+ - Clinical Radiography IV

    2 credits
    Supervised clinical rotation to observe and practice radiography. The student will continue to position patients for radiographic procedures, communicate effectively, provide patient care, calculate appropriate exposure factors, and provide radiation protection as appropriate under the supervision of a registered radiographer in the clinical setting. The student will demonstrate more independent performance of examinations for which competency has been earned. Clinical progress will be assessed and documented throughout the semester. Course coordinates with RSR 203+ - Positioning IV . [FALL] Course Fee. Twenty-four hours of clinical per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 146+ .
  
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    RSR 229+ - Image Analysis

    1 credit
    A course emphasizing the application of the problem-solving process in radiography. Radiographic images produced in the lab and clinical setting will be analyzed for quality and possible solutions to exposure, equipment, and positioning problems will be examined. [SPRING] Two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 146+ .
  
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    RSR 230+ - Radiation Biology and Protection

    2 credits
    A study of the effect of ionizing radiation on body tissues at the molecular and cellular level. An overview of the interaction of radiation with living systems and the factors affecting biological responses will be studied. The responsibilities of the radiographer to ensure that patients, personnel and the public are protected from excessive radiation exposure and the regulations affecting ionizing radiation at the federal- and state-level will be discussed. [SPRING] Two hours lecture, one hour laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 132+ .
  
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    RSR 235+ - Clinical Radiography V

    2 credits
    Final supervised clinical rotation to observe and practice radiography. The student will assume direct and independent responsibility to position patients for radiographic procedures, communicate effectively, provide patient care, calculate appropriate exposure factors, and provide radiation protection as appropriate. All competency requirements must be completed. Clinical progress will be assessed throughout the semester. Seventy-hours of clinical orientation must be completed prior to the start of the spring semester. [SPRING] Twenty-four hours of clinical experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 221+ .
  
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    RSR 240+ - Radiography Program Outcomes Analysis

    1 credit
    An analysis of the student’s mastery of radiography program goals and objectives. Students will analyze their knowledge of radiographic concepts and their ability to perform the competencies required for program completion. [SPRING] Two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RSR 221+ .

Science

  
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    SCI 102 - Humans in the Natural Universe

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An exploration of the natural sciences and the place of humans in the natural universe, designed for non-major students. Topics covered will include the process of science, matter, energy, basic organismal and human biology, disease, ecology, and planetary science. There will be an emphasis on the scientific method as a way of learning about natural phenomena. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: SCI 102 will not serve as a prerequisite for any other science course, nor as a course for students majoring in science or healthcare-related disciplines.  All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SCI 110 - Introduction to Astronomy

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to the study of the universe and how the scientific method is used to study it. Particular emphasis will be placed on current theories of how the universe, galaxy, and solar system came to be in their present state. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  MAT 031+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SCI 111 - Physical Geology

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to the study of the earth’s structures and processes, both internal and external. Laboratory exercises will include the study and identification of various rocks and minerals. [ALTERNATE YEARS - SPRING ODD] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SCI 141 - Physical Science

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to physical science, emphasizing the concepts of chemistry and physics. Topics will be presented and discussed through an interrelated approach designed for the non-science major. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SCI 142 - Earth Science

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An interdisciplinary course studying the earth and its environment in space. The principles of geology, meteorology, astronomy, oceanography, plate tectonics, and other related principles will be studied. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SCI 151 - Environmental Science

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to the study of the natural environment, designed to increase environmental literacy. The course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of the field, and includes significant field experience. Topics include systems thinking and analysis; basic concepts of the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere; resource use and conservation; environmental policies, agencies, and laws; human impact on ecological resources; and current issues in environmental science at global, regional, and local scales. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week, and required field experiences.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  MAT 031+  as a  prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SCI 271+ - Internship in Natural Science

    1 credit
    Offers students course credit for internship or cooperative learning experiences in the scientific workplace. By working with employers on a selected project that meets academic goals, students will develop practical workplace skills to complement their academic knowledge. At the same time, students will report regularly to an academic faculty member who will supervise the student’s progress, act as a liaison to the supervisor in the workplace, and evaluate the project to ensure that it meets academic goals. Students will present a final project to the supervising faculty member; the course grade will be assigned based upon that project and a written evaluation from the workplace supervisor.  [AS NEEDED] Five hours lecture over the course of the semester and three hours of work experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): A 2.0 GPA; completion of 12 credit hours; passing grade in one four-credit laboratory science course.
  
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    SCI 272+ - Internship in Natural Science

    2 credits
    Offers students course credit for internship or cooperative learning experiences in the scientific workplace. By working with employers on a selected project that meets academic goals, students will develop practical workplace skills to complement their academic knowledge. At the same time, students will report regularly to an academic faculty member who will supervise the student’s progress, act as a liaison to the supervisor in the workplace, and evaluate the project to ensure that it meets academic goals. Students will present a final project to the supervising faculty member; the course grade will be assigned based upon that project and a written evaluation from the workplace supervisor. [AS NEEDED] Ten hours lecture over the course of the semester and six hours of work experience per week
    Prerequisite(s): A 2.0 GPA; completion of 12 credit hours; passing grade in one four-credit laboratory science course.
  
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    SCI 273+ - Internship in Natural Science

    3 credits
    Offers students course credit for internship or cooperative learning experiences in the scientific workplace. By working with employers on a selected project that meets academic goals, students will develop practical workplace skills to complement their academic knowledge. At the same time, students will report regularly to an academic faculty member who will supervise the student’s progress, act as a liaison to the supervisor in the workplace, and evaluate the project to ensure that it meets academic goals. Students will present a final project to the supervising faculty member; the course grade will be assigned based upon that project and a written evaluation from the workplace supervisor.  [AS NEEDED] One hour lecture and nine hours of work experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): A 2.0 GPA; completion of 12 credit hours; passing grade in one four-credit laboratory science course.

Social Studies

  
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    SOS 170 - Introduction to Social Studies

    3 credits
    A survey of the world through human topics, beginning with agriculture and other early human technologies, and continuing to modern times. Each topic will be taught through examples drawn from events across time and all world regions. This course fulfills all World Civilization and Cultural Geography related Maryland A.A.T. competencies. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Sociology

  
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    SOC 161 - Sociology

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to sociological concepts, theories, and methods. The influence of the social environment on the individual in such areas as role, status, personality, mobility, and social control is studied. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SOC 162 - Social Problems

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A sociological analysis of the major social problems prevalent in American society. Consideration will be given to the social problems of poverty, crime, race relations, mental illness, alcoholism, drug addictions, and population. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SOC 165+ - Marriage and the Family

    3 credits
    An analysis of the structure and function of the family in contemporary American life. Consideration is given to the husband-wife and parent-child interrelationships. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): RECOMMENDED: SOC 161 .
  
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    SOC 167+ - Gerontology

    3 credits
    A study of the last third of life, beginning with preretirement. The impact of society’s demands and expectations of the older person and the individual’s reactions are studied with attention to healthcare, sexuality, recreation, retirement, occupational opportunities, and separation. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.  RECOMMENDED:  SOC 161  .
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SOC 169+ - Introduction to Thanatology

    3 credits
    An introduction and general survey of issues related to the subjects of death and dying. This academic exploration into a variety of humanistic disciplines will encourage students’ self-awareness and personal growth. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.  RECOMMENDED:  SOC 161 .
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    SOC 171 - Introduction to Human Services and Social Work

    3 credits
    An examination of the roots of social welfare, social work and human services in the experience of man; a philosophical and historical orientation to human services and social work; roles and modes of intervention of social work relating to human needs and social issues; survey of human services in the social welfare framework. The social, legal, and ethical aspects of human services will be examined within the profession. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
  
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    SOC 209 - Sociology of Chemical Substance Abuse

    3 credits
    An examination of social dimensions of substance abuse. Areas of study will include the drug scene, the maintenance of the habit or addiction, and the economic, social, and cultural factors influencing drug usage. [AS NEEDED] Three hours of lecture per week.
  
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    SOC 272+ - Practicum in Human Services

    3 credits
    Provides a field experience in the various areas of specialization in human services. Students are assigned to a community human services facility under faculty supervision. The practicum will provide first-hand experience in the issues of providing services to clients. [AS NEEDED] One hour lecture, nine hours practicum experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 273 and six credits in human services (SOC, PSC, MLH) courses.
  
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    SOC 273+ - Ethics in Human Services Practicum

    3 credits
    Provides an opportunity for experiential learning that prepares students for practice in the various areas of specialization in human services.  Students select a human services agency with faculty facilitation and supervision.  The practicum will provide first-hand experience in the issues of providing services to clients, including an emphasis on the examination of legal and ethical standards, analysis of ethical dilemmas in practice, and consequences of ethical violations in the various areas of human services and addiction. [SPRING] Two-and-a-half hours lecture per month and 100 total hours of practicum at placement.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 171 and 6 credits in human services (SOC, PSC, MLH) courses.

Surgical Technology

  
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    SGT 110 - Introduction to Surgical Technology and Patient Care Concepts

    2 credits
    Introduces the student to the health care delivery system and provides an overview of the role and responsibilities of the surgical technologist. Patient care concepts will be introduced including: ethical, moral, and legal responsibilities of the surgical technologist, communicating with the patient, pre-operative care of the patient, and patient’s response to illness and hospitalization, and assessment of patient’s physical, spiritual, and psychological needs. The characteristics of the professional surgical technologist, the professional organizations related to the profession, and credentialing options available to the surgical technologist will also be discussed. This course is offered in the summer session. [SUMMER] Four hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 211+ BIO 212+  , BIO 202+  . Corequisite: MED 106  
  
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    SGT 111+ - Surgical Technology Techniques I

    4 credits
    Introduces the discipline of surgical techniques. Introduction to: asepsis technique and infection control, instrument cleaning methods for prevention of infection, sterilization methods for prevention of infection, chemical disinfection, and environmental sanitation. Also includes an introduction to the sequence and principles of perioperative, intraoperative, postoperative care of the patient and the duties of the surgical technologist. This course introduces students to the duties of the circulator role, and duties of the scrub role. Common illnesses and emergency situations will be discussed with a focus on prevention of disease and promotion of wellness, surgical procedure, and technological sciences. This course is offered in the summer session. [SUMMER] Six hours lecture, four hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 211+ BIO 212+  , BIO 202+  . Corequisite: MED 106  .
  
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    SGT 112+ - Pharmacology & Anesthesia for the Surgical Technologist

    2 credits
    General principles of pharmacology and anesthesia as related to the surgical technologist in the surgical environment. Topics include: drug sources, classification and regulatory issues, indications for use and complications, adverse reactions, routes of administration, calculation, and medication handling by the surgical technologist on the surgical field. Emphasis on the relationship of the drug to the surgical patient during the preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative phases will be highlighted. A basic understanding of anesthesia and its uses will be included. This course is offered in the summer session.  [SUMMER] Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 211+  , BIO 212+  , BIO 202+  . Corequisite: MED 106  .
  
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    SGT 113+ - Surgical Procedures I

    3 credits
    Introduces students to: general, obstetrics/gynecologic, genitourinary, ear, nose and throat, oral-maxillary and plastic-reconstructive surgeries. Included in the presentation will be the indications and outcomes for the surgeries along with the anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology of the system(s) involved with the procedures.  [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SGT 110  , SGT 111+ SGT 112+ 
  
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    SGT 114+ - Clinical Experience I

    3 credits
    Beginner level operating room principles and procedures, including the application of basic skills learned in the laboratory setting. Applied skills include scrubbing, gowning, and gloving procedures; back table set up; mayo stand set up; the opening of sterile supplies; and the basics of instrument handling. Clinical requirements: 24 clock-hours per week, additional hours assigned as appropriate for student’s benefit; second scrub a minimum of three experiences per week and first scrub a minimum of four experiences per week. Appropriate record keeping is the responsibility of the student. [FALL] Twenty-four hours clinical practice per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SGT 110  , SGT 111+ SGT 112+  .  
  
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    SGT 121+ - Surgical Technology Techniques II

    4 credits
    Prepares the student to be an active member of the surgical team. Students will be introduced to general surgical techniques including devices, surgical robotics, and wound characteristics. Topics relating to wounds include types of wounds, inflammation, and the phases of healing. Other topics include sutures, accessory devices, surgical staplers, and suture needles; techniques used in preoperative diagnoses; and opening and closing of surgical wounds.  [FALL] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SGT 111+  .
  
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    SGT 123+ - Surgical Procedures II

    3 credits
    Continues introducing students to surgical procedures. Students will be introduced to: cardiovascular, peripheral vascular, neurological, orthopedic, and eye surgical procedures. Included in the presentation will be the indications and outcomes for the surgeries along with the anatomy and physiology, and pathophysiology of the system(s) involved with the procedures.  [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SGT 113+  .
     
  
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    SGT 124+ - Clinical Experience II

    1 credit
    Intermediate-level practice of operating room procedures, including continued application of basic laboratory skills in an operating room setting. Applied skills include scrubbing, gowning, gloving, and set ups with increased organization and speed, as well as instrument handling and increased manual dexterity. Clinical requirements: 40 clock-hours per week, with additional hours assigned as appropriate for student’s benefit; the first scrub role will be entered every day and as often as possible. Appropriate record keeping is the responsibility of the student. This course is offered during the winter session.  [WINTERIM] Forty hours clinical practice per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SGT 114+  .
     
  
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    SGT 134+ - Clinical Experience III

    3 credits
    Competent-level practice of operating room procedures, with skills performed with little to no assistance. Expectations include independent scrubbing for a variety of surgical cases, duties performed with increased speed and accuracy, increased awareness and anticipation of needs for the procedures and the needs of team members, and increased instrument handling skills. Clinical requirements: 24 clock-hours per-week (minimum); additional hours assigned as appropriate for student’s benefit. Appropriate record keeping is the responsibility of the student.  [SPRING] Twenty-four hours clinical practice per week.
    Prerequisite(s): SGT 124+  .

Technology

  
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    TEC 115 - Safety Management

    3 credits
    A study of the causes of accidents, methods of preventing accidents, personal protection, OSHA and MOSHA, i ndustry and general shop safety. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094 as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Theatre

  
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    THE 172 - Introduction to Theatre

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A survey of theatrical forms from ancient times to the present day. The course is designed to familiarize the student with the practices, philosophies, terminologies, and purposes of the theatre. It includes an analysis of the basic elements of the theatre: the play, playwright, player, director, and audience. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    THE 173 - Theatre Workshop

    1 credit
    An introduction to various aspects of the theatre. Activities of theatre will be studied on an individual basis and will include set design, scenery construction, publicity, theatre management, stage managing, and technical problems of acting, with each student selecting one area, or two related areas of interest. Hours arranged with the instructor. Some internships are offered in off-campus locations. May be taken for four semesters. [FALL/SPRING] One credit each semester.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    THE 174 - Theatre Workshop

    1 credit
    An introduction to various aspects of the theatre. Activities of theatre will be studied on an individual basis and will include set design, scenery construction, publicity, theatre management, stage managing, and technical problems of acting, with each student selecting one area, or two related areas of interest. Hours arranged with the instructor. Some internships are offered in off-campus locations. May be taken for four semesters. [FALL/SPRING] One credit each semester.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    THE 175 - Introduction to Theatre Production

    3 credits
    An introduction to all aspects of theatre production. Part I of the course is designed to offer students a formal introduction to the entire production process, from selecting the script through dismantling the completed production. Part II of the course involves training and participation in one of the following areas of production: acting, stage management, administration (front-of-house), marketing, or “tech” (backstage work, including lighting, sound, set, costumes and/or backstage crew). Involvement in a stage production is mandatory. [FALL/SPRING] One hour lecture, four hours independently scheduled studio time per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    THE 250 - Western Theatre

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A survey of written dramatic works, from classical to modern times, with an emphasis on writing style and literary elements. This course will focus on the literature of drama. [ALTERNATE YEARS - SPRING EVEN] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    THE 271 - Introduction to Acting

    3 credits
    An introduction to the theory and basic principles of acting with focus on scripted drama. Work in voice, body movement, characterization, and style is included. [ALTERNATE YEAR - SPRING EVEN] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
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    THE 273 - Theatre Workshop

    1 credit
    An introduction to various aspects of the theatre. Activities of theatre will be studied on an individual basis and will include set design, scenery construction, publicity, theatre management, stage managing, and technical problems of acting, with each student selecting one area, or two related areas of interest. Hours arranged with the instructor. Some internships are offered in off-campus locations. May be taken for four semesters. [FALL/SPRING] One credit each semester.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
 

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