The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
   
2016-2017 Chesapeake College Catalog
Chesapeake College
   
 
  Dec 15, 2017
 
 
    
2016-2017 Chesapeake College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Student Financial Assistance



Chesapeake College provides a variety of funding through federal, state and institutional student aid programs. All programs of student financial assistance at Chesapeake are available to both part- and full-time students. Most academic scholarships require full-time enrollment. In most cases, participation in the federal student financial aid programs requires a minimum enrollment of six credit/load hours in a degree or certificate program of study. The Federal Pell Grant program is available to eligible students who enroll less than half-time. Students must be certificate or degree-seeking to be considered for any aid programs. All student aid programs at Chesapeake require the completion of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid is completed online at www.fafsa.gov. The processing center will send a response to the student electronically once the form has been processed. Chesapeake College will receive an electronic response if the student lists our college code (004650) on their Free Application for Federal Student Aid.

When the Financial Aid Office receives all the necessary information, it evaluates the student’s application, determines eligibility and issues financial aid awards by letter and/or email.

Students are encouraged to complete their financial aid applications for the upcoming academic year before March 1, in order to receive first priority from State aid sources. Estimated data may be provided then corrected after tax forms are filed.

Federal Aid Programs

Application Forms Required:

Free Application for Federal Student Aid
Priority Deadline Dates: Fall Semester: May 1st;
Spring Semester: December 1st;
Summer Semester: April 1st

Federal Pell Grant
The Federal Pell Grant is a federal grant awarded on the basis of
financial need. Award amounts are determined by the United States Department of Education according to the student’s cost of attendance, the enrollment status, and the student’s calculated eligibility (known as the “Expected Family Contribution”). Students may apply for the Federal Pell Grant by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid online at www.fafsa.gov.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are federal grants awarded to students with financial need. FSEOG grants are awarded with priority given to students who have eligibility for the Pell Grant program.

Federal Work-Study Program
The Federal Work-Study Program assists students who have financial need by providing part-time employment. FWS jobs are located on campus usually, but many off-campus worksites are available at other public agencies, private non-profit organizations, and private for-profit companies and businesses. Students employed through this program are paid a minimum of $10 per hour, depending upon the complexity of the job to which they are assigned.

Special note: The College does not participate in the Federal Stafford or the Federal Direct student loan programs.

Maryland State Aid Programs

Application Forms Required:

Free Application for Federal Student Aid
Deadline Date:  March 1st

State Scholarships and Grants

State Scholarships and Grants
The State of Maryland’s Office of Student Financial Assistance offers a variety of scholarships and grants to its residents who attend Maryland colleges and universities. Many of these programs, such as the Guaranteed Access Grant, Educational Assistance Grant, and Senatorial Scholarships, require the Free Application for Federal Student Aid Form. Applications must be processed before March 1st to be considered for state aid. A separate application may be required. Contact the Office of Student Financial Assistance at 1-800-974-0203, for more information or access their Website at www.mhec.state.md.us.

Maryland Part-Time Grant

This state scholarship program is awarded by Chesapeake College. Students must be enrolled in six to eleven credits, be in a degree-seeking program, a Maryland resident and Federal Pell Grant eligible. All funds are awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Students should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid by our priority deadline date of May 1st to be given consideration.

Edward T. Conroy Scholarship

This state scholarship program is awarded by Chesapeake College. Students must complete the application and provide all supporting documentation by our priority deadline date of May 1st. Edward T. Conroy Memorial Scholarship Program provides financial aid to:

  • Sons and daughters of members of the United States armed forces who died as a result of military service or who suffered a service connected 100 percent permanent disability as a result of military service;
  • A veteran who suffers a service connected disability of 25 percent or greater as a result of military service and has exhausted or is no longer eligible for federal veterans’ educational benefits;
  • POW/MIA’s of the Vietnam Conflict and their sons and daughters;
  • Sons and daughters and surviving spouses (who have not remarried) of victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks who died as a result of the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, the attack on the Pentagon in Virginia, or the crash of United Airlines Flight #93 in Pennsylvania;
  • Sons, daughters and surviving spouses (who have not remarried) of State or local public safety employees or volunteers who died in the line of duty or who sustained an injury in the line of duty that rendered the public safety employee or volunteer 100 percent disabled.
  • A state or local public safety employee or volunteer who became 100 percent disabled in the line of duty.

Local Private Assistance

Application Forms Required:

Refer to donor for application
Deadline Date: Varies

Many organizations in the five-county area served by the College offer private scholarships. These scholarships are awarded by the organizations and criteria can vary. Students can learn more about these private scholarships at local high schools, libraries and individual service organization directories. For the most current listing of scholarships, please refer to our Website at www.chesapeake.edu.

James H. Barton Memorial Scholarship (Q22)
This scholarship is available to Queen Anne’s County residents with a 2.0 grade point average enrolling at Chesapeake College either full- or part-time. Contact Mr. James Barton at: 410-758-2996, for more information.

Chesapeake Women’s Network (P54)
The Queen Anne’s and the Talbot chapters each offer a scholarship to a female student residing in Queen Anne’s, Talbot, Caroline or Dorchester counties. Preference is given to a student re-entering college or the job market. Selection is made by the Network. The Queen Anne’s Chapter’s deadline is March 31st. The Talbot Chapter’s deadline is May 1st.

Chesapeake College’s Scholarship Programs

Application Forms Required:

Chesapeake College Scholarship Application
Deadline Date:  Please refer to the current scholarship application for specific deadlines.

Chesapeake College’s Scholarship Programs are funded only by the generous support of local donors, particularly the College Board of Trustees; corporate, civic, social and individual sponsors; Chesapeake faculty and staff, alumni, friends and students of the College. To comply with the award criterion set by donors, Chesapeake College Scholarship Chair may share information about students’ academic and financial information to determine eligibility for a scholarship.  By signing the Scholarship Application, students authorize the release of  such information to scholarship donors.

Institutional Grants

Chesapeake Ambassador Grants (AMD)
Two students are selected by the Dean for Recruitment Services to serve as Chesapeake Ambassadors in the College’s admissions/recruitment department. Each student must enroll either full- or part-time at the College and is required to work approximately eight hours per week in the Admissions Office in exchange for partial or full coverage of tuition and fees and a book allowance for the academic year. This grant is renewable.

Institutional Scholarships

Honors Scholarships

Chesapeake Scholars (S50)
The  Scholarship awards are provided by the faculty and staff of Chesapeake College to outstanding students who intend to enroll as full-time students and who have achieved at least a 3.0 grade point average in high school. Award amounts vary.

Presidential Honors Scholarships (S52)
The Presidential Honors Scholarships, provided by the Chesapeake College Board of Trustees, are the most prestigious scholarships offered by Chesapeake College. Awarded to the most academically talented senior in each of the nine public high schools who has achieved at least a 3.5 grade point average over four years. This scholarship covers tuition and fees up to 14 credits per semester. Recipients must participate in the Honors Program at the College. The scholarship is renewable for the second year of study with a College grade point average of 3.0.

Endowed Scholarships

The following scholarships have been established as endowments within the Chesapeake College Foundation. Availability of these scholarships, even those that mention a specific amount, is determined by available earnings for each individual endowment.

The Chesapeake College Foundation, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) corporation. For more information about the Foundation, please contact the Executive Director at: 410-827-5818.

American Legion Post #29 Scholarship (Q05)
A scholarship of $2,500 will be awarded annually to a resident of Caroline County who has participated in an oratorical contest or attended Boys or Girls State. An essay and a 3.0 grade point average are required.

Bay Country Moose Lodge #831 Scholarship (E39)
The Bay Country Moose Lodge #831 endowed this scholarship with preference given to an eligible applicant who is a dependent of a Lodge member. The scholarship is offered to residents of Queen Anne’s County who enroll as full-time students and is renewable.

Blake Blackston American Legion Post #77 Endowed Incentive Grant (E41)
The Blake Blackston American Legion Post #77 endowed an incentive grant program to benefit students from Talbot County with financial need and who have either a 2.0 high school grade point average or the ability to benefit as determined by the College.

Charles E. Blythe Memorial Scholarship (F25)
A scholarship of $250 per semester is awarded to a student taking one or more courses in the Engineering Technology Program. A 2.5 grade point average is required. This scholarship is renewable to complete a student’s program of study.

The Brick Companies/Queenstown Harbor Golf Scholarship (E43)
This scholarship is available to Queen Anne’s County residents who have achieved a 2.0 grade point average and enroll full-time. The scholarship is renewable for a second year of study with a 2.5 grade point average.

Michele O’Donnell Bullock Endowed Scholarship (BULL)
This scholarship, established by the family of Michele O’Donnell Bullock, provides scholarship support to students who live on the Eastern Shore and pursue careers in nursing or education. Students must have a minimum grade point average of 2.5 or higher. This scholarship is renewable.

Julia Thomas Burleigh Endowed Scholarship (JTBUR)
This scholarship, established through a generous donation of a charitable gift annuity, provides scholarship support to students who live on the Eastern Shore. The award amount varies.

Caroline High School Alumni Association Scholarship (CHSA)
Established in 2008, this scholarship is awarded to residents of Caroline County with a 2.5 grade point average or higher. It is for both part-time and full-time students and is renewable for a second year.

The Reade W. and Mary P. Corr Endowed Scholarship (CORR)
This scholarship is awarded to Kent County students with a grade point average of 2.0 or higher. It was established by the late Reade Corr, a former Kent County School Superintendent, founding member of the Chesapeake College Board of Trustees and Chesapeake College Foundation member.

Judith A. Crook Memorial Scholarship (F26)
A scholarship of $500 is awarded after the fall semester to a student taking one or more courses in the Radiologic Sciences Program. A 2.5 grade point average is required.

Jeff Davis Post #18 American Legion Scholarship (E40)
The Jeff Davis Post #18 American Legion sponsors this scholarship. Recipients are selected jointly by the Post and the College, and must reside in Queen Anne’s County. Selection preference is given first to dependents or relatives of Post #18 members, then to dependents or relatives of Queen Anne’s County veterans.

Easton Elks Lodge #1622 Scholarship (E34)
The Easton Elks Lodge #1622 endowed four scholarships for full-time students from Talbot or Caroline counties who enroll in a degree program. Award preference is given to eligible students who are dependents of Lodge members.

E. E. Streets VFW Post #5118 Scholarship (E29)
The E. E. Streets VFW Post #5118 sponsors one scholarship in the amount of $1,000 for a student from Talbot County to attend Chesapeake College on a full-time basis.

Federalsburg VFW Post #5246 (S36)
The Federalsburg VFW Post #5246 sponsors a scholarship in the amount of $2,000 to be awarded by Chesapeake College to a graduate of Colonel Richardson High School who resides in Caroline County. The student selected for the scholarship must enroll and pursue a full-time program of study. This scholarship is renewable, provided the student maintains the eligibility criteria required by the College. If the scholarship is continued for the sophomore student, a second Federalsburg VFW Post #5246 scholarship will be awarded to an entering freshman student who is eligible.

General Endowed Scholarship (E01)
The General Endowed Scholarship is awarded to an Eastern Shore resident with a 3.0 grade point average. The scholarship amount varies and is renewable.

J.C. Gibson Memorial Book Scholarship (F23)
This scholarship provides book scholarships to economically disadvantaged traditional and non-traditional students from the five-county area who enroll in a degree or certificate program. The maximum amount for each award is $200. The scholarship is provided from funds donated by community organizations, family friends and Chesapeake College co-workers of the late Mr. Gibson. The scholarship is renewable.

Herbert Goldstein Memorial Scholarship (S11)
One scholarship, in the amount of $500, is awarded to a resident of Queen Anne’s County. The scholarship is sponsored by the family in memory of Mr. Goldstein.

Grasonville VFW #7464 Scholarship (E22)
The Grasonville VFW #7464 sponsors a $1,600 scholarship for a full-time student who is also a first-time freshman. Preference is given to a Queen Anne’s County resident with a 3.0 grade point average. The recipient will only be awarded for the second semester upon successful completion of the first. A second scholarship of $400 is available for a veteran enrolled part-time. These scholarships are not renewable for a second year.

Heartfields Memorial Scholarship (HEART)
This scholarship was created by the family of a resident of Heartfields. It provides scholarship assistance to employees or dependents of employees of Heartfields, Londonderry or its subsidiaries who wish to pursue a degree in the Allied Health or Nursing Programs.

Samuel T. Hemsley Elks Lodge #974 Incentive Grant (E21)
The Samuel T. Hemsley Elks Lodge #974 endowed an incentive grant to benefit students from the Eastern Shore with financial need and who have a minimum 2.5 grade point average.

Hospitality Endowed Scholarship (TOUR)
This scholarship is available to students pursuing Chesapeake College’s Hotel/Restaurant Management Program either for credit or non-credit. Selection will be made by the program instructors and the donor.

ING Nursing Scholarship (E50)
This scholarship is awarded to an Eastern Shore resident, admitted into the Nursing Program, who holds a grade point average of 2.0 or higher. Available for traditional or non-traditional students, this scholarship is renewable. The scholarship amount varies.

Kent County Mental Health Scholarship (E44)
One scholarship will be awarded annually to a resident of Kent or Queen Anne’s County. Applicants must have a 3.0 grade point average. Preference will be given to full-time students.

Michael D. Kilgus Memorial Scholarship (KILG)
Established in 2013, this fund was created to honor the memory of Michael Kilgus, a Vice President at Chesapeake College. It may be awarded to a Maryland resident with a 2.75 or higher grade point average. The scholarship is intended to go to students who exhibit strong leadership skills, high ambition and great dedication.

Robert E. McCauley Scholarship Fund (REM)
This scholarship was established in 2003 by the Kent Island American Legion Post #278 in memory of member Robert E. McCauley. It is intended to support direct educational expenses of student athletes and is renewable for a second year of study. Selection is made by the Athletic Scholarship Committee.

Lee D. and Audrey McMahan Scholarship (E03)
The Lee D. and Audrey McMahan Scholarship was endowed by Tri-Gas and Oil Company to provide scholarships for full-time and part-time students. Preference will be given first to employees or dependents of employees of Tri-Gas and Oil, then to any resident of the Eastern Shore.

John E. “Bunny” Mears Scholarship (E33)
The John E. “Bunny” Mears Scholarship was endowed by friends and colleagues of Mr. Mears to honor his long-time civic contributions. Interest earned from this endowment is awarded to a deserving student from Queen Anne’s County with financial need. The scholarship may be renewed.

Herman F. and Dorothy Mielke Citizenship Scholarship Fund (HMCS)
This scholarship was endowed by the family of Herman F. Mielke, who served Talbot County government for 24 years. This award will go to a Talbot County student who is interested in political science and is focused on citizenship and community service.

The James Bayard Noble Memorial Scholarship (P76)
A scholarship of $1,000 is awarded annually with preference given to residents of Dorchester and Caroline counties. Recipients must have a 3.0 grade point average.

Queen Anne’s County Council of Homemakers (E42)
The Queen Anne’s County Council of Homemakers sponsors a scholarship for a Queen Anne’s County resident who is active in 4-H, a homemaker or a relative of a homemaker. Awards vary and may be awarded for full- and part-time study to students with a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

Queenstown Lions Club Scholarship (E46)
The Queenstown Lions Club endowed a scholarship to provide scholarship assistance to a graduate of the Queen Anne’s County public school system. An applicant must be sponsored by a member of the Queenstown Lions Club.

The Rosborough-Schleiger Endowed Scholarship (E18)
This scholarship is available to an Eastern Shore resident who is a first-time freshman. The scholarship is sponsored by the Schleiger family in memory of the parents of both Mr. and Mrs. Schleiger.

St. John Foundation Scholarship (SJF)
Multiple scholarships will be awarded to Talbot County residents with a minimum 2.0 grade point average.

John M. Saulsbury Educational Grant (SAUL)
This grant is available to students in Caroline, Queen Anne’s, and Dorchester counties. This grant is awarded based upon financial need and academic potential. For recent high school graduates academic potential is measured by the official high school transcript. For older students, ability to benefit from college study is determined by minimum score achievement on the College Academic Skills Assessment in mathematics, reading, and language skills. Grant awards vary and are offered to eligible full- and part-time students.

Norma and Orrell Saulsbury Incentive Grant (E31)
Mr. and Mrs. Saulsbury endowed the Norma and Orrell Saulsbury Incentive Grant program for students with financial need. Award preference is given to residents of Caroline County who enroll as full-time students, then to full-time students from the College’s service area, then to part-time students. Eligible students must have a 2.0 high school grade point average or the ability to benefit as determined by Chesapeake College.

The Gunther & Regina Schiwy Endowment Fund (SCHIW)
This fund was established by the family of Gunther & Regina Schiwy as a way to honor these two residents of the Eastern Shore.  Preference is given to students taking electrical or engineering courses; students taking environmental engineering courses will also be considered.  Recipient must be a resident of Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s or Talbot counties.

Seraph Foundation Nursing Scholarship (SFNUR)
This scholarship is awarded to students in the RN Nursing Program.

Arthur E. Southard Memorial Accounting Scholarship (SOUTH)
The family of Arthur Southard established this scholarship to honor a long-time resident of Queen Anne’s and Talbot counties who devoted his life to the service of others. The scholarship is available to Eastern Shore residents with a 2.5 grade point average or higher who are either pursuing a career in accounting or are studying accounting as a means to enhance their careers.

Luther W. Smith/Eastern Shore Litho Association Scholarship Fund (LITHO)
This scholarship was endowed by the Eastern Shore Litho Association to honor founding member Luther W. Smith. The recipient must be a resident of the Eastern Shore with a minimum 2.5 grade point average. Those studying business, preferably communications, will be considered. Dependents of those in the graphic arts industry are encouraged to apply.

Sylvester Family Scholarship Fund (SYLV)

This scholarship is available to a Queen Anne’s County resident who is a traditional or non-traditional student, and plans to enter the field of teaching. The scholarship is sponsored by the Sylvester  family in memory of Betty and Bill Sylvester.

Talbot American Legion Post #70 and Auxiliary Scholarship (E45)
The Talbot American Legion Post #70 endowed a scholarship program to provide assistance to a full- or part-time student with first preference given to a student from Talbot County.

Eugenia V. Teodoli Endowed Scholarship Fund (EVT)
This endowment was funded with a gift from the Eugenia V. Teodoli Trust. Mrs. Teodoli, a Queen Anne’s County resident who passed away in 2006, established the Trust to help students in need of financial assistance with their educational pursuits. The scholarship is available to graduates of Queen Anne’s County High School or Kent Island High School.

Ernest M. Thompson Memorial Scholarship (E20)
The Easton law firm of Wheeler, Thompson, Parker, and Counts endowed a memorial scholarship in memory of Mr. Thompson in 1991. The scholarship will provide full tuition for a student from Talbot County who qualifies for the award.

Dr. Shirley M. Thompson Memorial Scholarship (F24)
This scholarship in the amount of $500 or more is awarded to a student from the Eastern Shore and is renewable providing a 3.5 grade point average is maintained and the student shows financial need. The scholarship was established by colleagues, friends and family in memory of Dr. Thompson who was a faculty member of Chesapeake College.

Harry Wrightson Tolson American Legion Post #278 Scholarship (E24)
The Harry Wrightson Tolson Scholarship, endowed by the American Legion Post #278, provides four scholarships to residents of Queen Anne’s County. Preference is given to Kent Island residents enrolled as full-time students in a degree or certificate program. Applicants are required to have financial need as determined by completion and submission of the Financial Aid Form. The scholarship is renewable.

Viniar Honors Scholarship Fund (VIN)
This fund was created by Chesapeake College President Dr. Barbara A. Viniar. Students who are eligible for Phi Theta Kappa and are from Caroline, Dorchester, Kent, Queen Anne’s or Talbot counties are qualified for this award. One student per year will be awarded.

George Walls Memorial Scholarship (WALL)
This scholarship is available to an Eastern Shore resident. This scholarship is renewable for a second year.

George W. Wilson, Jr., Esq. Scholarship (GWS)
The family and friends of George W. Wilson, Jr. established this fund to honor the memory of this long-time professor at Chesapeake College. It is eligible to students with demonstrated financial need who are majoring in Paralegal Studies, Criminal Justice or Computer Forensics. Good character and orientation toward service and volunteerism are also considered.

Winslow and Helen Womack Endowed Scholarship (WOMAC)
This scholarship is available to Eastern Shore residents who are majoring in nursing.

General Scholarships

Many area organizations and businesses, as well as private individuals, sponsor scholarships at Chesapeake College. Generally, these scholarships are awarded to full-time students who demonstrate academic potential by their high school transcript or achieve academic success at Chesapeake College as measured by the official Dean’s List. Applications for these scholarships should be completed by mid-April. High school students must submit copies of their high school transcripts in order to be considered. Under most circumstances, tuition-based scholarship award amounts are calculated on the average enrollment load of 14 credits per semester.

Alpha Delta Kappa Sorority Scholarship (S01)
Xi Chapter of the Alpha Delta Kappa Sorority, an international honorary organization of educators, sponsors a $500 scholarship in honor of Belle Andrews, a former educator and chapter member. This scholarship is for full- or part-time students to assist with tuition and book expenses. Selection preference is given to a non-traditional female student from the Eastern Shore who has completed the first year of study at Chesapeake.

Adult Education Scholarship (ADULT)
Chesapeake College is funding a scholarship for students who are graduates of an adult education program and have earned a General Education Diploma (GED). Students who reside in the five-county service area may apply.

Barnes and Noble Book Scholarship (B&N)
This scholarship is awarded by the Director of Financial Aid on a case by cases basis.  The student should contact the Financial Aid Office for more information.

Diane Bisnar Scholarship (DBIS)
Established by the Easton Memorial Auxilary, this scholarship provides funding to all Allied Health majors who have been admitted into their program.

A.T. and Mary H. Blades Foundation Scholarship (BLADE)
This scholarship is available to Talbot, Dorchester and Caroline County residents who are enrolled full-time and hold a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

Mary H. Blades Memorial Nursing Scholarship (MBNUR)
This scholarship is available to Talbot, Dorchester and Caroline County residents who are pursuing a degree in nursing on a full-time basis and hold a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

Bowdle Family Scholarship  (BOWDL)
The Bowdle Family is funding a two-year scholarship in the amount of $5,000 each year for admitted nursing students who reside in Dorchester, Talbot or Caroline counties.  Student must be non-traditional and serious-minded about a career in nursing.

George and Jean Brinckerhoff Book Scholarship (GJBBK)
This scholarship is available to Eastern Shore residents who hold a 2.5 or higher cumulative grade point. The scholarship is not renewable.

Woody Cannon Non-Traditional Scholarship (S71)
This scholarship is provided by the generous donations of the family, friends, faculty and staff who knew Woody.  Part-time and non-traditional students may apply for this scholarship.

Cannon Educational Fund Scholarships (S37)
Cannon Scholarships are awarded to graduates of North Caroline and Colonel Richardson high schools who have documented financial need.  Award amounts vary, but may not exceed actual tuition and fee expenses.  Award preference is given to students who have completed the first year of study at the College, with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 and above. Secondary preference will be given to eligible students who participate in the College Work-Study Program.

CNB Scholarships (S04)
The Centreville National Bank of Maryland sponsors two scholarships in the amount of $400 per semester each year for students who are residents of Queen Anne’s, Kent or Caroline counties.

Chesapeake College Challenge Scholarship (S05)
A scholarship of $100 per year is awarded to a student with special needs or disability. The student may enroll full- or part-time. The scholarship is renewable.

Chesapeake College General Scholarship (CCGEN)
This scholarship is available to all students attending Chesapeake College full- or part-time.  Award amount varies.

Chestertown Rotary Club Scholarship (S08)
One scholarship in the amount of $200 is available each year to a resident of Kent County with a good academic standing who enrolls as a full-time student.

Delmarva Power Scholarship (CONEC)
One scholarship of $1,000 will be awarded to a full- or part-time student who maintains a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade point average.  Applicants must major in Engineering or Business Management Technology.

Denton Rotary Club Scholarship (P75)
The Denton Rotary Club sponsors a $500 renewable scholarship for a student from northern Caroline County who is attending classes at least part-time and who has a 3.0 grade point average.  

Easton Lions Club Nursing Scholarship (Q08)
The Easton Lions Club will award a $1,000 scholarship to a Talbot County resident enrolled in the Nursing Program. To be eligible the student can be traditional or non-traditional, but must be full-time and have a 3.0 grade point average.  This scholarship is not renewable.

Dave Haslup/Lou Gehrig Athletic Scholarship (HASLP)
This donor-advised fund with the Mid-Shore Community Foundation provides athletes of the five-county area, with preference given to Queen Anne’s and Talbot county students who lettered in a sport in high school.  Eligible students must enroll full-time and have a minimum grade point average of 2.0. The scholarship is renewable for a second year if the student maintains the required grade point average and remains on a sports team.

Hulseberg Memorial Scholarship (HULS)
This scholarship is awarded to first-generation college students who reside in our five county service area.

Bernard Kobrin Memorial Scholarship (KOBRN)
A current North Caroline High School graduate may apply for this scholarship.  Applicants must hold a 3.0 high school grade point average, demonstrate need as determined by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid and major in education or nursing.

Learned Peabody Porter Scholarship Fund (LPPS)
This fund was established by a Talbot County resident to honor her family members.  It is awarded to students who demonstrate need and hold a 3.0 or higher GPA.

Maryland Law Enforcement Officers Scholarship (S32)
Maryland Law Enforcement Officers, Inc., offers up to a $1,000 scholarship to a person with financial need who enrolls as a full-time student in the Criminal Justice Program (degree or certificate) at the College.  Eligible applicants must be residents of the Eastern Shore.

May Foundation Nursing Scholarship (MFNUR)
This scholarship is available to a student from the Eastern Shore. Preference is given to students from Queen Anne’s County, who have been admitted into the Nursing Program.

May Foundation Scholarship (S26)
The May Foundation sponsors a $500 scholarship, which is awarded to a full-time student from the Eastern Shore (with preference given to Queen Anne’s County students).

Medical Auxiliary Scholarship (MEDX)
This donor-advised fund with the Mid-Shore Community Foundation provides scholarships to Talbot County residents who wish to further their education in the medical field.  Priority is given to students pursuing Allied Health programs other than Nursing.

Nathan Foundation Scholarship (NFNS)
This scholarship is available to Dorchester County residents who are pursuing a degree or certificate in Allied Health, including LPN, RN, Surgical and Radiological Technologies. Preference will be given to nursing students.

The 1880 Bank Scholarship (S13)
This scholarship is available to a full-time student who resides in Dorchester County.  The scholarship is renewable.

Oxford Library Scholarship (OXF)
This scholarship is awarded to a current Easton High School graduate who resides in Oxford and holds a 2.5 cumulative grade point average or higher.  Students must demonstrate need. Students must maintain a 3.0 grade point average to be renewed for the Spring term and the scholarship may be renewable a second year, if the student maintains a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

People’s Bank of Kent County (S14)
A scholarship in the amount of $500 will be awarded annually to a full-time student who is a resident of Kent County.

Queenstown Bank Scholarship (S16)
This scholarship is available to residents of Queen Anne’s County who are attending the College as full-time students.

Elaine and Roger Ralph Scholarship (RALPH)
This need-based scholarship is available to non-traditional students who are single parents.  Priority is given to Queen Anne’s County residents.

Dr. Harry C. Rhodes Scholarship (HRS)
This scholarship is awarded to current high school graduates from Kent Island and Queen Anne’s County High School who achieved a 2.75 cumulative grade point average.  Students must maintain a 2.75 grade point average to be renewed for the spring term.  This scholarship is not renewable for a second year.

Ridgely High School Alumni Scholarship (RASF)
The Alumni Association of Ridgely High School sponsors this $250 scholarship.  This scholarship is available to descendants of Ridgely High School alumni.

Shirk Fund Scholarship  (Q02)
This donor-advised fund with the Mid-Shore Community Foundation provides funding to single mothers and dependents of single mothers who have a desire to enter or re-enter the workforce.

Simpson Memorial Scholarship (S69)
One $600 scholarship is awarded to a resident of the five-county service area, with preference given to Kent and Queen Anne’s counties.  This scholarship is renewable. The recipient may enroll either full- or part-time.

Gale Quimby Sinagra Memorial Scholarship (S70)
The Gale Quimby Sinagra Memorial Scholarship is sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Quimby, Jr. and family in honor of their daughter.  A student must be enrolled part-time with at least a 2.5 grade point average and be a resident of the Eastern Shore.  It is renewable for a second year, if funds are available.

H. T. Slaughter, Jr. Scholarship (S10)
One scholarship of $500, sponsored by the Easton Lions Club, is awarded each year to a resident of Talbot County with financial need.

Pauline and Shirley T. Smith Educational Fund (SMITH)
This bequest fund with the Mid-Shore Community Foundation provides funding for Maryland residents with preference to Eastern Shore residents who hold a second year status and have achieved academic success.  Applicants must have demonstrated need and work to pay for college.  A separate application and essay will be required provided by Mid-Shore Community Foundation.

Talbot County Women’s Club Scholarship (P97)   
One $1,000 scholarship will be awarded to a full-time female student, with preference given to a single parent, pursuing Teacher Education who resides in Talbot County. This scholarship is renewable.

Tudor Farms Scholarship (P61)
Tudor Farms sponsors two $500 scholarships for residents of Dorchester County. Applicants must have at least a 2.5 high school grade point average. Recipients may enroll either full- or part-time.

VFW Post #5118 Commander’s Scholarship  (VFW)
This scholarship is available to a Queen Anne’s, Talbot or Caroline county resident enrolling full-time who holds a 2.5 grade point average.  Preference is given to post members or their relatives.  All awards must be approved by the Charity Committee each year.

VFW Post #5118 Nursing Scholarship (S29)
A scholarship will be awarded to a student in the Nursing Program who enrolls full-time with at least a 2.0 grade point average.  Preference will be given first to a member of the VFW Post #5118 or family member, then to a Talbot County resident, or to a resident of the Eastern Shore.
 

Other Assistance Programs

  • Waivers of tuition and fees for foster care recipients are available to certain students who resided in foster care in the State of Maryland at the time they graduated from high school or successfully completed GED; or you must have resided in foster care on your 13th birthday and were then adopted after your 13th birthday. The student must not be older than 25 years of age when enrolling as a degree seeking student at Chesapeake College.  The student must file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid by March 1st, of each year.  The waiver covers tuition and fees.
     
  • DC Tuition Assistance Grant Program for District of Columbia residents allows District residents attending Chesapeake a tuition subsidy that will pay the difference between in-state and out-of-state tuition. Funding is for tuition only. Students must currently live in the District and have lived there for at least 12 consecutive months prior to the beginning of their freshman year of college; they must have graduated from high school or received the equivalent of a diploma on or after January 1, 1998; students must have begun their undergraduate course work within three years of graduating from high school; students must be enrolled at least half-time and must not have completed their undergraduate program.
  • A Senior Citizen Tuition Waiver is available with proper documentation. Please contact the Business Office for eligibility requirements and application to apply.
  • Disability Waiver Policy - Any resident of Maryland who is out of the workforce because of a permanent disability as defined by the Social Security Act, the Railroad Retirement Act, or in the case of former federal employees, the Office of Personnel Management, and enrolls in a community college class that has at least 10 regularly enrolled students, may be eligible for a tuition waiver.  Students may be enrolled for up to 6 credits per semester without declaring a degree or certificate.  Letters of Recognition programs are no longer eligible for the waiver.  Certain Continuing Education programs are eligible if they lead to employment.  Please consult the list of eligible programs at http://www.mhec.state.md.us/career/WIA/WIASearch/WIACountyPgm.asp.  This waiver is for tuition only.

Once a student enrolls in more than 6 credits, they must declare a major and apply for federal financial aid.  The priority deadline date for the Fall term is May 1st and the Spring term is December 1st.  Students must complete the Certificate for Tuition Waiver Form and have it authorized by the Social Security Administration.  Students are no longer permitted to receive both federal/state aid and the waiver unless the federal/state aid is insufficient to cover tuition.  Students receiving SSI/SSDI as a dependent or survivor of a disabled beneficiary do not qualify for this waiver.  Waiver forms should be submitted to the Director of Financial Aid for review and final approval.

  • Workforce Investment Funds are available for students who are in need of employment-related and occupational training. Federal funds are available for those curriculums that have been approved by the Maryland Higher Education Commission. To see a listing or for more information, call or stop by any of the One-stop Career Centers, 410-822-1716, or review the Website at www.uswib.org.
  • Unaccompanied Homeless Youth Waiver Policy Act - defines an unaccompanied homeless youth as a youth whose living situation is not “fixed, regular, and adequate,” (homeless) and who is “not in the physical custody of a parent or guardian” (unaccompanied).  The Act provides examples of living arrangements that would be considered homeless, including living in emergency and transitional shelters, living doubled-up with others due to loss of housing, and living on the street or in a car.  This waiver covers tuition and fees.  Waiver forms should be submitted to the Director of Financial Aid for review and final approval.  All financial aid awarded to the student will be used to cover indirect expenses and refunded to the student after the enrollment verification process is complete.  Students MUST complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid on or before March 1st, each year to be eligible for the waiver of tuition and fees.
  • Maryland National Guard Tuition Waivers are available for students who are currently serving in the Guard. Please contact the Business Office for eligibility requirements and application to apply.

Conditions of Awards

ACADEMIC STANDING
Students must make satisfactory academic progress in order to receive funds from the Federal Pell Grant, Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, College Work-Study Programs, and the state and institutional aid programs. Awards will be withdrawn from students who do not maintain satisfactory academic progress. Institutional scholarship programs require a student to maintain a 2.5 cumulative grade point average unless noted otherwise.

ACADEMIC YEAR
An academic year is defined as 29 credit hours. Remedial credits can be included.

CHANGES IN FINANCIAL STATUS
Students must report changes in financial status (decreases in income, benefits, etc.) to the Office of Financial Aid. The student’s financial need may be recalculated based on the change(s), and adjustments to financial aid packages will be made if necessary.

CONCURRENT ENROLLMENT
Students may only be degree-seeking and receiving federal financial aid at one college. The United States Department of Education will notify Chesapeake College if a student is enrolled at two colleges within the same semester and awarded financial aid at both colleges. Once notified, we will rescind ALL aid awarded and the student will be responsible for their semester charges.

DRUG-RELATED CONVICTIONS
Students convicted of processing or selling illegal drugs while receiving federal aid will lose eligibility for federal financial assistance until certain conditions are met. For more information, contact Federal Student Aid Processing at 1-800-433-3243.

DURATION OF PELL GRANT ELIGIBILITY
Students will not be eligible for Federal Pell Grants beyond 12 semesters or equivalent as determined by federal regulation. Federal regulations will provide fractional equivalents for terms in which a student is enrolled less than full-time.

ENROLLMENT STATUS
Financial aid awards may be adjusted when students change their enrollment status (e.g. from full-time to three-quarter or half time). In some instances, these students may be required to repay a portion of the aid received. Students must notify the Office of Financial Aid of all changes in enrollment status. Students reported as never attending class will have their aid rescinded. Students must register for all sessions within a term such as “Fall Interim” during the normal registration process prior to the start of the regular term.

ESTIMATED AID
An estimated financial aid package may be awarded to a student pending corrections, documentation or other materials needed to finalize an award. Estimated awards are done at the discretion of the Director of Financial Aid. Failure to provide the necessary documents could result in the student owing their entire term charges.

FINALIZATION
Students receiving financial aid are required to finalize their term bills. They are required to do so in person at the Business Office in Wye Mills, Easton or Cambridge Center or online through My Campus. Failure to properly finalize will result in the student’s course schedule deletion and aid package being rescinded.

FINANCIAL LITERACY
All students should understand how to manage money and credit to make informed decisions now and in the future. For more information, visit our Web page at http://www.chesapeake.edu/finaid/fa_literacy.asp.

OUTSIDE SCHOLARSHIPS
Students awarded scholarships from outside the institution must report these awards to the Office of Financial Aid. If a student’s direct costs have been met, the award package may be reduced.

OVER-AWARDS
Students who receive funds in excess of their financial need are over-awarded. The amount of the over-award must be repaid, regardless of the origin of the error, before further federal financial assistance may be received.

REPEAT CLASS
Financial Aid will only pay for courses previously dropped or failed twice and courses passed with a D grade or better only once. 

STUDENT ELIGIBILITY
Students who do not have a high school diploma, or an equivalent such as a GED, and who did not complete secondary school in a homeschool setting are not eligible for Title IV funds.  Under specific conditions, a student may be eligible for Title IV funds if they meet the guidelines for Ability to Benefit.

STUDENT ID
Students who are receiving financial aid must use their student identification number when making inquiries to the Financial Aid office and when purchasing books from the College’s Bookstore.

TUITION SCHOLARSHIPS
In the event that a student receives multiple tuition scholarships, the institutional tuition scholarship will be re-awarded to another student. This is to ensure that a maximum number of Chesapeake students are being considered for such scholarships.

UNOFFICIAL WITHDRAWAL
Students receiving financial aid MUST attend class regularly. Once notified of non-attendance in one or more classes, the Financial Aid Office will RESCIND ALL aid offered/accepted until the student provides proof of attendance.

VERIFICATION
Students selected for verification by the United States Department of Education or Chesapeake College, must provide all necessary financial documents before any financial aid will be disbursed. Failure to comply may result in the student being responsible for all institutional charges incurred for the term.

WITHDRAWALS
Federal financial aid recipients who withdraw completely from the term will be subject to regulations governing the return of federal funds. Federal funds will be prorated using software provided by the United States Department of Education. Students owing a refund will not be permitted to register for future terms until the balance is paid in full. Attendance will be monitored and unofficial withdrawals will be subject to the same federal regulations. Students reported as never attending class will have their entire aid package rescinded. Students will be responsible for all institutional charges incurred for the term.

Policies Governing Federal Financial Aid

Ability to Benefit Policy

Chesapeake College will only admit students who are beyond the age of compulsory attendance; however there are two groups of students who are enrolled, but not matriculating in a degree or certificate program; dually enrolled and gifted and talented students.  Students with those designations are permitted to enroll, but are exempt from federal aid eligibility and Ability to Benefit regulations.

Generally students who do not have a valid high school diploma, GED, or a home schooling document that meets our school’s policy, will not be eligible for federal financial aid.  However, students may still be eligible to receive financial aid by demonstrating the Ability to Benefit (ATB).  Please note: students who are no longer in high school and earned a Certificate of Attendance, must demonstrate the ATB in order to be eligible for financial aid.  There are two ways to demonstrate ability to benefit:

  1. By taking the ATB Accuplacer Test at the Chesapeake College Testing Center.  The Accuplacer Test is independently administered by The College Board.  Chesapeake College Testing Center administers the Accuplacer as an ATB test. 

    Chesapeake College Testing Center is not part of the Admissions or Financial Aid Offices and its primary purpose is not the administration of ATB tests. Testing center staff are independent of the Admissions process and the Accuplacer is   given at an assessment center by an employee who is a certified test administrator.  Test scores are valid for ATB purposes indefinitely.
  2. Successful completion of six college level credits (not including developmental classes) also serves as the equivalent of passing the ATB test.  Students may complete the courses at Chesapeake College or another Title IV eligible institution, but are not eligible for aid while earning these credits.  The courses must be applicable toward a degree or Title IV eligible certificate, regardless of transferability.  Student must submit an official or unofficial transcript to the Financial Aid Office for determination of six college level credits completed successfully.  College level courses are defined as credit courses and exclude remedial education courses.

Students who have previously qualified through the ATB or the 6 credit successful completion rules are “grandfathered” in.  Students must have met the rule and be enrolled in an eligible program prior to July 1, 2012 to meet the “grandfather” rule.

Students who are enrolled in an eligible career pathway program, as defined in section 484(d)(2) of the HEA, on or after July 1, 2014, and who are not high school graduates, or do not meet one of the other eligibility conditions listed above, may be eligible to receive Title IV aid if the student meets one of the following ATB alternatives as defined above.  A student who meets one of those alternatives may use that alternative to establish his or her Title IV eligibility at any eligible Title IV institution where the student enrolls in an eligible career pathway program as defined.

There is an opportunity for students who are enrolled in eligible career pathway programs, but who lack a high school diploma or its recognized equivalent, or who did not complete a secondary school education in a homeschool setting, to become eligible for Title IV aid using one of the ATB alternatives.

One of the requirements of an eligible career pathway program is the student must be concurrently enrolled in a connected adult education and eligible postsecondary program.  An eligible career pathway program contains two components: an adult education component and a Title IV eligible postsecondary program component. In this context, “adult education” has the same definition as it does under the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, Title II of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (Pub. L. 113-128) and includes academic instruction and education services below the postsecondary level that increase an individual’s ability to:

Read, write, and speak in English and perform mathematics or other activities necessary for the attainment of a secondary school diploma or its recognized equivalent;

Transition to postsecondary education and training; and

Obtain employment.

Beginning with the 2015–2016 award year, any student whose first enrollment in any Title IV eligible postsecondary program on or after July 1, 2015, and is eligible under one of the ATB alternatives for enrollment in an eligible career pathway program, will be eligible for a Limited Pell Grant award.  These Limited Pell Grant awards for such students will be determined using the appropriate Career Pathway Alternative Pell Grant Disbursement Schedules.  Any otherwise eligible student whose first enrollment in any Title IV eligible postsecondary program was before July 1, 2015, and who is enrolled in an eligible career pathway program in or subsequent to the 2015–2016 award year, is eligible for a Regular Pell Grant award.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy
The United States Department of Education mandates Chesapeake College to have an established Satisfactory Academic Progress policy for financial aid students.  The policy must be qualitative (grade point average requirement) and quantitative (maximum time frame for completion) and minimum passing of coursework.  A students’ entire academic record will be evaluated once they apply for financial aid. The policy must be at least as strict as the academic policy governing students not receiving financial aid.  Progress will be monitored once the student attempts their 6th credit hour.

In order to have an equitable policy for both full-time and part-time students, the graduated grade point average will be utilized.  Status will be checked every semester, including summer.  If it is determined that a student is not making satisfactory progress, they will be placed on Financial Aid Warning the following term (including summer). The student will be eligible for financial aid for one term.  If at the end of the following semester the student has not obtained a 2.0 cumulative grade point average or a grade point average equivalent to their earned credit hours and/or completed at least 67 percent of their attempted courses, they will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension and ineligible for all aid. Non-enrollment periods do not improve a student’s status.

Graduated Qualitative Standard
Chesapeake College requires students to have a 2.0 cumulative grade point average to graduate.  The graduated standard for the minimum GPA throughout the academic program is as follows:

  Students with less than 30 hours 1.5 GPA
  Students with 31 to 60 hours 1.7 GPA
  Students with 61 + 2.0 GPA

Quantitative Standards

Students must complete 67 percent of all course work attempted during each semester and cumulatively. Transfer credits will count towards attempted and earned courses. Example: Student enrolls in 12 credit hours for the fall term and completes only six credit hours at the end of the term. The completion rate is as follows: 12 attempted credit hours/6 completed credit hours = 50% completion rate.

Maximum Timeframe
A student will be given a maximum time frame of 150 percent to complete their program of study.  This will hold true for certificate and AA degree programs.

The average AA program requires 65 credit hours for program completion; the maximum time frame cannot exceed 97 attempted credit hours (65 x 150% = 97). The average certificate program requires 29 hours for program completion; the maximum time frame cannot exceed 43 attempted credit hours (29 x 150% = 43).

The Financial Aid Office will evaluate each recipient based on the number of credits required for completion of their program of study.   All courses attempted, regardless of academic program will count toward maximum time frame, therefore; students should select their program of study carefully and follow their academic program precisely.

Remedial course work up to 30 load hours (including repeated courses) will not count against the maximum time frame.  Remedial course work will be monitored in order to adhere to the maximum limit set at 30 load hours.  Should a student meet the 30 load hour limit, their enrollment status would exclude future remedial course work in determining eligibility for federal aid. If the student is not enrolled in credit courses, their eligibility will be suspended until credit enrollment exists.

Transfer Credits
Students who have attended another institution prior to Chesapeake College must have their academic transcripts evaluated by our Registrar.  All credits accepted for transfer will be counted in both attempted and earned credits in the Satisfactory Academic Progress calculation.

Minimum Passing of Coursework
Each student must pass a portion of the program for each semester enrolled. In order to maintain eligibility a student must pass AT LEAST 67 percent of the semester course load.  When determining the minimum passing of coursework, the Financial Aid staff will round down to the nearest credit hour.

  1. Final passing grades are A, B, C, and D.
  2. Final non-passing grades are F, L, R, W and I.
  3. Depending on the date of the change to audit, audit (AU) grades are not eligible for financial aid payment. However, if a student is enrolled in one class and changes to audit, the action will be treated as withdrawing from a regular program and a Return of Title IV funds calculation will be performed.
  4. The incomplete “I” grade may be recalculated to restore eligibility only after a passing grade is recorded and the change of grade occurs within the current academic school year. Any grade changed after the last date of enrollment will be counted for future eligibility.
  5. Students who withdraw from classes jeopardize their completion rate since the course(s) count in the attempted credits.

Minimum Grade Point Average
In addition to completing a minimum portion of each semester with a passing grade, students must achieve a minimum grade point average (GPA).  Satisfactory academic progress is determined by examining the ratio of points to credit hours.  A 2.0 cumulative GPA is required for graduation. To be considered as making satisfactory academic progress, a student must maintain:

Credit Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
6 - 30
31 - 60
61 +
1.5 GPA
1.7 GPA
2.0 GPA

 

Financial Aid Review Process
Financial aid recipients will be reviewed for satisfactory academic progress at the end of every semester including summer.  Students who do not meet the standards for progress will be placed on Financial Aid Warning automatically for one semester while continuing to receive financial aid.  If, at the end of the warning period, they have not met the requirements for continuation of aid, financial aid awards will be suspended until the minimum requirements are achieved.

Financial Aid Suspension
After one semester of Financial Aid Warning, if a student is still not meeting Satisfactory Academic Progress, they will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension.  During suspension status, students are ineligible for financial aid.  Students may appeal their suspension status by completing the Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form.

Financial Aid Dismissal
Once a student has been granted two appeals and continues to fail Satisfactory Academic Progress, the student will be permanently DISMISSED from financial aid.  Students are still permitted to register and enroll in courses at Chesapeake College but will do so without the benefit of financial aid. A Financial Aid Dismissal status is FINAL and there is no appeal process.  This is a federally mandated policy.

Appeal Process
Students have the right to appeal the unsatisfactory progress status twice.  A student may appeal submitting the Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form to the Director of Financial Aid.  Documentation will be required to substantiate the request.  The appeal will be reviewed and the student will be notified of the decision in writing by mail or Skipjack e-mail.  Students will be permitted to apply for TWO appeals based on specific circumstances such as; death of a relative, injury or illness of the student or other special circumstances. Failure to withdraw resulting in a failing grade is not considered a legitimate defense for poor performance. If the appeal is granted, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation.  In the appeal the student MUST include how they will correct their deficiencies and make satisfactory academic progress by the end of the following semester.  Students with Academic Plans may submit those plans as a course of action. The Academic Plan must lead to the student achieving Satisfactory Academic Progress within a specific timeframe not to exceed three semesters.  The Director of Financial Aid will determine if the plan submitted will lead to meeting SAP and approve the request. Part-time students will be given additional semesters on a case by case basis. However, if the plan provided will NOT improve the students’ status, the appeal will be denied.  Furthermore, a student who breaches any conditions of an approved plan will be permanently suspended from federal financial aid.  Breaches include withdrawing and failing classes in the semester the appeal has been granted.

Financial Aid Probation
Students who have been granted a suspension appeal will be placed on Financial Aid Probation for one semester.  The student must reestablish eligibility based on the standards above at the end of the probationary semester.  Students with approved academic plans or a corrective action plan may continue to receive financial aid if they adhere to their plan. Any deviation from a student’s approved plan will be cause for Financial Aid Dismissal after their second appeal.  A Financial Aid Dismissal status is FINAL and there is no appeal process.  This is a federally mandated policy.  Students are still permitted to register and enroll in courses at Chesapeake College but will do so without the benefit of financial aid.

Summary of Standards

  1. You may only receive federal financial aid for a specific length of time (150 percent of the published length of the program plus a maximum of 30 attempted credits of developmental education).
  2. You must pass at least 67 percent of all coursework attempted each semester.
  3. You must maintain satisfactory academic progress qualitatively and quantitatively.
  4. A Return of Title IV funds calculation will be performed for students changing to audit when enrolled in only one course.
  5. Financial aid will not pay for future audited (“AU”) courses, or repeat (“R”) grades.
  6. Financial aid will only pay for repeated courses twice for courses withdrawn from or failed.
  7. Financial aid will pay for courses students have successfully passed only once regardless of the grade received.
  8. If the student is on Financial Aid Suspension at the end of the spring semester, the student will be ineligible for aid for summer and all subsequent semesters until the students’ status improves.

If you have any questions concerning this policy or your eligibility, please call the Financial Aid Office at: 410-822-5400, ext. 252 or write us at Chesapeake College, P.O. Box 8, Wye Mills, MD 21679.

Change of Major

Students should understand that changing his/her major may have a negative impact on financial aid eligibility. Students should seek academic advising before making such considerations.

Return of Federal Funds Policy

In accordance with the final regulations specified in DCL GEN-11-14 and in the 34 CFR 668.22, the following policy explains the process by which Chesapeake College determines the amount of Title IV funding that the student earned when they have withdrawn from the institution.  Students are awarded Title IV funding under the assumption that they will complete all courses in which they are enrolled.  If a student fails to meet this standard and withdraws or ceases attendance in all courses within a payment period, the institution  must determine the amount of aid that the student earned, and the amount of aid that must be returned.  The burden is shared between the student and the institution to return Title IV funding to the U.S. Department of Education.

  1.   Identification of Student Withdrawal
    1. Types of Student Withdrawal
      1. Official:  A student is an official withdrawal when the student begins the official withdrawal process in accordance with WWCC’s withdrawal policy as stated in the college catalog.
      2. Unofficial:  A student is an unofficial withdrawal when the student ceases attendance in all courses prior to the end of the payment period without providing official notification of the intent to withdraw. Students who fail to receive a passing grade in all courses would be considered an unofficial withdrawal.
      3. Non Attendance:  A student is administratively withdrawn if the student fails to attend all courses that the student is scheduled to attend.
    2. Date of Withdrawal
      1. As an institution that is not required to take attendance, the date of withdrawal is determined as the date the student dropped or withdrew from all courses, unless notified otherwise that the student has begun the official withdraw process.
      2. For students who cease attendance and/or fail to receive a passing grade in their courses, the date of withdrawal is determined as the last date of attendance/academically related activity.  This is reported by instructors three different ways; the start of term FTE roster, Mid-term Grade Roster and Final grading roster.  Calculations and adjustments are made after each roster is reviewed.
    3. Online Courses
      1. A student will be marked as attending an online course if the student has actively participated in the course.  Active participation includes, but is not limited to, participating in online discussions about academic matters, submitting an academic assignment, taking an exam or participating in an online interactive tutorial, etc.  Just “logging in” is NOT considered attending.
      2. If a student withdraws from an online course, the determination of the withdrawal date will be consistent for in person courses.
      3. If a student ceases attendance in an online course, the last date of attendance will be determined based on the last date of academically related activity as documented by the instructor.
    4. Programs Offered in Modules

      A program is offered in modules if the courses do not span the entire length of the payment period.  If a student is enrolled in any course that does not span the entire length of the payment period, the student is considered to be enrolled in a program offered in modules for that payment period.  However, if a student is only enrolled in courses that span the entire length of the payment period, that student is not considered enrolled in a program offered in modules for that payment period.
      1. Identifying Withdrawals
        1. According to DCL-GEN-11-14, a student will be identified as a withdrawal if the student ceases attendance at any point prior to completing the payment period.
        2. For students enrolled in modules, there are three questions to be evaluated in determining if a return of Title IV calculation must be conducted.  These questions are provided as guidance in the FSA Handbook:
          1. After beginning attendance in the payment period, did the student cease to attend or fail to begin attendance in a course he or she was scheduled to attend? 
            1. If no, this is not a withdrawal.
            2. If yes, go to the next question. 
          2. When the student ceased to attend or failed to begin attendance in a course he or she was scheduled to attend, was the student still attending any other courses? 
            1. If yes, this is not a withdrawal; however, other regulatory provisions concerning recalculation may apply.
            2. If no, go to the next question.
          3. Did the student confirm attendance in a course in a module beginning later in the period?
            1. If yes, this is not a withdrawal, unless the student does not return.
            2. if no, this is a withdrawal and the Return of Title IV Funds requirements apply. 
      2. Written Confirmation of Future Attendance 
        1. A student is not considered a withdrawal for Title IV purposes if the student provides written confirmation that he or she plans to attend a module in a future module within the same payment period. 
        2. If written confirmation is obtained and the student later fails to attend or does not complete the later module, a return of Title IV calculation must be completed using the number of days the student attended all modules as the numerator and the total span of days that the student was scheduled to attend as the denominator. 
      3. Withdrawal Between Modules 
        1. Students who withdraw or stop attending classes between modules are considered a withdrawal and a return of Title IV calculation must be completed.  This applies also if the student is administratively dropped by the institution.  The calculation will include all days that the student was scheduled to attend, even if the student ceased attendance. 
        2. If the student withdrew from future models prior to ceasing attendance, the student is no longer scheduled to attend those modules.  If a return of Title IV calculation is needed, the calculation is based on the modules that the student is scheduled to attend as of the date of withdrawal.
  2. Elements of the Return of Title IV Calculation
    1. Percentage of Payment Period Completed
      1. The denominator in this calculation is defined as the total number of calendar days in the payment period that the student was scheduled to attend at the time of his or her withdrawal, not including any scheduled breaks of five or more days.  All courses offered in modules must be taken into consideration.
      2. The numerator in this calculation is defined as the total number of days completed by the student in all modules within a payment period.
      3. Scheduled Breaks
        1. The number of days a student is scheduled to attend within a payment period must exclude institutionally scheduled breaks of five days or more.
        2. If a student withdraws during a scheduled break, the withdrawal date used in the calculation is the last date of scheduled attendance prior to the beginning of the scheduled break.
    2. Percentage Earned
      1. The amount of Title IV funding earned by students is determined by multiplying the students percentage of payment period completed by the Title IV funding that could be disbursed to the student.
      2. If this percentage is equal to 60 percent of the payment period, then the student will earn the Title IV funding to which they were awarded.
    3. Title IV funding included in Return to Title IV Calculation
      1. The Return calculation should include all Title IV funding awarded to the student during the payment period based on their enrollment status.  Possible awards include Federal Pell Grant, FSEOG, Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans, and Direct PLUS Loans.  WWCC does not participate in the Federal Perkins Loan, National SMART Grant, TEACH Grant, or Academic Competitiveness Grant programs.
      2. If a student fails to begin attendance or drops courses within the drop period, a student’s financial aid award will be reevaluated based on enrollment status.
      3. If a student was awarded a Direct Loan and drops below or is reported as not attending at a half-time status at the time of disbursement, the student is no longer eligible for the Direct Loan. The loan is cancelled.
    4. Institutional Charges
      1. Institutional Charges include costs for tuition, fees, books, and supplies for the courses that the student is scheduled to attend at the onset of the payment period.
      2. If a student is reported as a no show or drops one or more courses within the drop period, but remains enrolled in at least one course beyond the end of the drop period, the institutional charges for these courses will be based on their revised charges.
      3. Waivers
        1. Waivers are considered payments of tuition costs that are charged to the student’s account.
        2. The tuition charges for all courses should be included as institutional charges in the Return of Funds calculation.  
    5. Date of School’s Determination that Student Withdrew
      1. For Official Withdrawals, the date the school determines that the student withdrew is the date the student began the withdrawal process.
      2. For Unofficial Withdrawals, the date of determination is the date the instructor reports on the FTE, Mid-Term Grade or Final Grade Roster.
  3. Timeline
    1. All Return of Title IV Funds Calculations must be completed within 30 days from the date the institution determined the student withdrew.
    2. The funds must be returned within 45 days from the date the institution determined that the student withdrew.
  4. Return of Title IV Funding
    1. The Return calculation is conducted through the Return of Funds tab in FAAccess. The Return of Title IV Funds on the Web worksheet provided on FAA Access to CPS Online is printed then the calculations are entered in Colleague.
    2. Return of Funds by the Institution
      1. The institution is responsible for returning the unearned Title IV funding as determined by the lesser of the total amount of unearned aid or the amount of unearned charges.
      2. The return of funds is conducted in the following order:
        1. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant
        2. Federal Pell Grant
        3. Federal Perkins Loan
      3. The adjusted aid amount is transmitted with the next weekly transmittal process and the funds are returned to the U.S. Department of Education.
    3. Return of Funds by the Student
      1. The amount of Title IV funding that the student is responsible for returning is the difference between the total amount of unearned aid and the aid that the institution is required to return.
        1. If the difference is $0 or less, the student will not be required to return Title IV funding.
        2. Students will repay Federal Perkins Loans in accordance with the regulations stated on the master promissory note.
        3. Students are responsible for a maximum of 50 percent of the total grant funding awarded.  Students are not responsible for returning funds to any grant program to which the student owes $50.00 or less.
  5. Post-Withdrawal Disbursement
    1. If a post-withdrawal disbursement is determined, the funds are disbursed to the student to cover educational expenses incurred during their time of enrollment
    2. If a student notifies the Financial Aid Office that they do not wish to accept the funds, the Title IV funding is returned.
  6. Reports
    1. Student Mis-Match,FTE, Mid-Term and Final Grade Reports
      1. Student Mis-Match Reports are run periodically throughout the payment period to determine students who have dropped or withdrawn from all of their courses that they were scheduled to attend.  This report indicates a difference in registered credits and financial aid credits enrolled.  It identified students who withdrew from each course, which is used to identify the date that the student began the official withdraw process.
      2. The FTE roster is the Start of Term roster sent to instructors to certify if a student has started enrollment in their course.  Last dates of attendance and NO SHOWS are reported before our official census date (20% date of term).
      3. The Mid-term Grade Report is another opportunity for instructors to indicate a Last Date of Attendance to capture all unofficial withdrawals.  This report is generated after the 7th week of classes in a 15 week term and includes all modules within the payment period.
      4. The Final Grade Report is the final report whereby instructors can enter Last Dates of Attendance for any student who unofficially withdrew.  All F grades are reviewed and Return of Title IV calculations are performed on all students who have unofficial withdrawals prior to the 60% point of the payment period.
  7. Notifications
    1. Upon completion of the Return of Funds calculation, students are notified that their financial aid has been adjustment based on a change in their enrollment status.
  8. Consumer Information
    1. Information about the requirement of Return of Federal Funds is made available to students in the college catalog (available online ) and our financial aid webpage at www.chesapeake.edu/finaid.

Case Study

Method for Returning Title IV Aid

Max is a first year student at Chesapeake College living at home with his parents. He is enrolled in a two-year Liberal Arts program and he purchased his books at the campus Bookstore. Max enrolled full-time for the spring semester and classes began on January 24th. Max used his book voucher one week before classes started to purchase his books.

Academic Calendar for spring semester is:
Term Start Date:
Term End Date:
Spring Break:
Classes Resume:
January 24
May 12
March 13 - 17
March 20
   
Max’s program costs for the semester are:
Tuition and Fees
Books and Supplies
Room and Board
Transportation
Personal
Total Cost
$   843
     200
     675
     367
     552
$2,637
   
The aid awarded to Max for the spring semester is:
Federal Pell Grant
Federal Perkins Loan
Total Aid
$1,562
$1,200
$2,762
   

After attending classes, Max officially withdraws from the college on March 24. The following was credited to his institutional account for the spring semester on January 14.

Institutional Account:
Student Name: Max Jenkins ID#111111

Federal Pell Grant
Federal Perkins Loan
$1,562
$1,075

Total Aid Credited to Institutional Account - $2,637

Max signed his Perkins Loan Promissory Note on January 15th.

The disbursement included the following aid:
Federal Pell Grant
Federal Perkins Loan
$1,562
$1,200
   

Total Cash Disbursed to Student - $125
Percentage of aid earned = 53.3 percent
(56 days completed/105 days in the spring term = .533)

Percentage of aid unearned = 46.7 percent
(100 – 53.3 = 46.7 percent)

Amount of aid earned by the student = $1,472
(53.3 percent of aid x $2,762 total aid disbursed = $1,472)
Amount of aid unearned = $487
($1,043 x 46.7 = $487)

Title IV aid to be returned = $1,290
($2,762 – 1,472 = $1,290)

Student must return $803 to federal programs
($1,290 amount of aid to be returned - $487 unearned aid = $803)

$487 of Perkins Loan returned by the school
$713 of Perkins Loan returned by the student
$ 45 of Pell Grant returned by the student
(amount of return of grant is reduced by 50 percent)

Federal Verification

The Department of Education selects financial aid applications at random for a process called verification. Chesapeake College verifies ALL students selected by the Central Processing Center who are eligible to receive aid based on funding levels set each year. Students/parents who estimate income must correct his/her FAFSA with accurate income once a tax form has been filed. Chesapeake College will not correct estimated income and will consider the file incomplete until a corrected transaction is received. In addition, Chesapeake College has the right to request data for any information that appears incorrect or inconsistent even if the file was not selected for verification. Chesapeake College has the right to select any student not already selected by the United States Department of Education.

Each student selected for verification will be required to complete a verification worksheet and attach copies of signed federal tax transcripts for student, spouse and/or parent if determined a dependent student. Students/parents who utilize the IRS data retrieval may still be required to provide federal tax transcripts. If a student or parent needs to request a tax transcript from the Internal Revenue Service, please call 1-800-829-1040 or go to www.irs.gov. Please refer to https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/redirects/federal-student-aid-ed-gov  for the federal regulation governing dependency. We will notify students by email of all documents needed to complete the students file. It is not uncommon to discover additional documents needed after a file has been considered complete during the process of verifying. Students will be notified in writing if additional information is needed. The following data elements must be verified: adjusted gross income; U.S. income taxes paid; household size; number in college; untaxed income such as, child support, and untaxed portion of pensions; child support paid and SNAP (Food Stamp Benefits). High School completion status, Identity/Statement of Educational Purpose.

The deadline for receipt of all documents is May 1st for the Fall term and December 1st for the Spring term. We will accept late applications and will notify students as they apply what documents are outstanding. Incomplete files will not be reviewed or considered for any federal aid. Students who are in financial aid suspension or in default of a federal student loan, will not be sent any request letters until they become eligible. Once the student has submitted all documents for completion, the Financial Aid Office will review the file and notify the student in writing by awarding the student or sending another status letter.

On a case-by-case basis, a student’s incomplete file may be awarded pending documentation but only at the Director’s discretion. The award will be entered as ESTIMATED and funds will NOT be disbursed until the documentation has been received. Students MUST provide all documents within 10 days of the request. Late applicants must provide all documentation before their LAST DATE OF ATTENDANCE. Any changes in eligibility as a result of verification will be sent to students as REVISED award letters. If the student fails to provide the necessary documentation, he/she will be required to pay all charges incurred.

On occasion a student’s file will be selected for verification after funds have been disbursed. Chesapeake College will notify the student of the documents required but will not disburse any future funds until the verification process has been completed. If verification proves the student is no longer eligible for the funds disbursed, they will be required to repay those funds, except for earnings under the Federal Work-Study Program.

Financial Aid Administrators at Chesapeake College are required by the U.S. Department of Education to resolve any and all conflicts in information or documentation provided directly or indirectly by the student. What is CONFLICTING INFORMATION? This is the terminology used when information in the student’s file is in conflict. A few examples would be dependent students who claim themselves on their federal taxes as do their parents, or no tax forms for a student who was required to file a 1040 with the IRS, or a student who certifies they have a high school diploma but indicates on their admissions application they are working on their GED. These are all examples of conflicting information. All conflicts must be resolved BEFORE any financial aid can be awarded or disbursed. Become familiar with IRS regulations governing who must file a tax form, disclose all scholarship awards, and do not put false or misleading information on any official college documents are a few ways students can avoid conflicting information.

Default Management Plan for the Federal Perkins Loan Program at Chesapeake College

As a small community college, our participation in the Federal Perkins Loan program provides the necessary means to fund higher education for many of our students. Students who are awarded and choose to accept this loan must be committed to repaying this loan and abiding by all program requirements, such as; completing the Entrance Interview. The student will sign a promissory note, promising to repay this federal debt, understand their rights and responsibilities, complete a personal data sheet and take a quiz before the funds will be disbursed.

This federal student loan is repaid with an interest rate of five percent and payments begin after the student ceases attendance or drops to less than half-time status. Chesapeake College values this low interest federal loan program and wants to do everything it can to preserve its integrity. The future is at risk if students do not adhere to their repayment schedules, consequently defaulting on their commitment to repay this federal loan. As a proactive measure to insure the viability of this loan program, Chesapeake College has instituted a default management plan.

The United States Department of Education has the right to sanction any school with a default rate of 50 percent or higher three years consecutively. As a pre-emptive measure, Chesapeake College has instituted the following policies and procedures in an effort to reduce our current default rate. In addition to meeting the financial eligibility requirements and complete an Entrance Interview, students will have to meet the additional guidelines listed below:

  1. All Federal Perkins Loan recipients must maintain a 2.5 semester and cumulative grade point average and meet Satisfactory Academic Program requirements for attempted credits for any loan consideration or renewal.
  2. Students must provide a physical address in addition to their post office box number on their college admissions application as well as all entrance/exit documents.
  3. Students must have a declared major and have an academic plan coordinated with their academic advisor.
  4. Students must meet the May 1st deadline as it proves they understand the importance of deadlines.
  5. Students must meet with the Director of Financial Aid prior to signing their promissory note and at the end of the fall term before the pay-by-date for spring. Students will be advised to make appointments to fulfill this requirement. Failure to meet this requirement will result in forfeiture of the Federal Perkins Loan.
  6. No loan funds will be disbursed if there is missing information on their Personal Data Sheets.
  7. Students will be required to utilize their campus e-mail address so that important reminders can be easily addressed to loan recipients.
  8. Students will complete a “test” after completing their Entrance Interview, to review the information learned and reinforce the importance of loan repayment and default prevention.
  9. Current recipients will be grandfathered if they do not meet one or more of the above criteria at the discretion of the Director of Financial Aid.

The primary reason students default on federally funded student loans is not completing deferment forms. A deferment form is required each semester if a student transfers to another school so the loan servicer will know the student is still enrolled and eligible for an in -school deferment status. During a deferment period, the interest on the Federal Perkins Loan does not accrue and no payments of principal or interest are required. If the student withdraws, fails to enroll, transfers to another school or has a change of address, the student should notify Chesapeake College and University Accounting Services, our Federal Perkins Loan billing agency. They can be reached at 1-800-999-6227. Failure to notify the school and billing agency could result in loan default and affect credit-worthiness and the ability to obtain financial aid in the future.

Chesapeake College takes loan defaults very seriously and wants to help students avoid defaulting at all costs. If you enter repayment and are unable to make your payments, please contact the Director of Financial Aid before you default, for assistance. During a deferment period, the interest of your loan does not accrue and repayment of the principal is not required.

Chesapeake College Office of Financial Aid Statement of Ethical Principles

The primary goal of the financial aid professional is to help students achieve their educational potential by providing appropriate financial resources. To this end, this statement provides the financial aid professional with a set of principles that serves as a common foundation for accepted standards of conduct.

The financial aid professional shall:

  1. Be committed to removing financial barriers for those who wish to pursue postsecondary learning.
  2. Make every effort to assist students with financial need.
  3. Be aware of the issues affecting students and advocate their interests at the institutional, state, and federal levels.
  4. Support efforts to encourage students, as early as the elementary grades, to aspire to and plan for education beyond high school.
  5. Educate students and families through quality consumer information.
  6. Respect the dignity and protect the privacy of students, and ensure the confidentiality of student records and personal circumstances.
  7. Ensure equity by applying all need analysis formulas consistently across the institution’s full population of student financial aid applicants.
  8. Provide services that do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, age, sex, national origin, ancestry, sexual orientation, disability, pregnancy, military status or any other class protected by law.
  9. Recognize the need for professional development and continuing education opportunities.
  10. Promote the free expression of ideas and opinions, and foster respect for diverse viewpoints within the profession.
  11. Commit to the highest level of ethical behavior and refrain from conflict of interest or the perception thereof.
  12. Maintain the highest level of professionalism, reflecting a commitment to the goals of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators.

Chesapeake College Code of Conduct for Financial Aid Professionals

An institutional financial aid professional is expected to always maintain exemplary standards of professional conduct in all aspects of carrying out his or her responsibilities, specifically including all dealings with any entities involved in any manner in student financial aid, regardless of whether such entities are involved in a government sponsored, subsidized, or regulated activity.

In doing so, a financial aid professional should:

  1. Refrain from taking any action for his or her personal benefit.
  2. Refrain from taking any action he or she believes is contrary to law, regulation, or the best interests of the students and parents he or she serves.
  3. Ensure that the information he or she provides is accurate, unbiased, and does not reflect any preference arising from actual or potential personal gain.
  4. Be objective in making decisions and advising his or her institution regarding relationships with any entity involved in any aspect of student financial aid.
  5. Refrain from soliciting or accepting anything other than nominal value from any entity (other than an institution of higher education or a governmental entity such as the U.S. Department of Education) involved in the making, holding, consolidating or processing of any student loans, including anything of value (including reimbursement of expenses) for serving on an advisory body or as part of a training activity of or sponsored by any such entity.
  6. Disclose to his or her institution, in such manner as his or her institution may prescribe, any involvement with or interest in any entity involved in any aspect of student financial aid.

Truth in Lending Disclosures

Chesapeake College takes pride in keeping its tuition rates low and providing a convenient payment plan leading to the Board decision to not participate in the William D. Ford Direct Loan program. We understand that some students may still feel the need to borrow and will seek a Private Educational Loan. Chesapeake College does not endorse lenders and does not have a preferred lender list. Student must seek their own funding source. However, we do want students to be educated loan borrowers and will provide the following information:

  • Private lenders will provide a Truth in Lending statement that must be signed by the borrower. In the statement, students will learn of their rights and responsibilities as a borrower of a private loan.

    Private loans are NOT federal educational loans

    Private lenders will charge their own interest rate and terms and conditions of repayment. Loan eligibility is determined by the Cost of Attendance, Estimated Financial Aid and the difference between the Estimated Financial Aid and Cost of Attendance.
  • Chesapeake College does not impede on a student’s decision to borrow, however, we require ALL students to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid for the loan period in order to determine if the student is eligible for any Title IV Aid or institutional aid. Students may borrow up to Costs of Attendance minus any financial assistance the student is receiving. All loans are certified and may be adjusted based on those factors as well as the loan period the student is applying. All Costs of Attendance are based on a nine month enrollment period. All loans will be made payable to Chesapeake College and the student. The student must endorse the loan and the Business Office will refund any credit balance within 10 to 14 days unless otherwise noted.

Cost of Attendance

Need is determined by subtracting the student’s Expected Family Contribution from the Cost of Attendance (COA). The COA includes the following: tuition, fees, books and supplied, room and board, transportation and personal expenses. The following COA are for the 2016/2017 academic school year:

CAMPUS-BASED COST OF ATTENDANCE

2016/2017

AT HOME DEPENDENT/INDEPENDENT (D01/I01)

 
  FULL-TIME   THREE-QUARTERS TIME   ONE-HALF TIME   LTH
TUITION AND FEES $  4,362 $2,181   $  3,130 $1,565   $2,206 $1,103      $1,282 $   641
BOOKS AND SUPPLIES $  1,100 $   550 $  1,100 $   550   $   600 $   300   $   400 $   200
TRANSPORTATION $  3,500 $1,750 $  3,500 $1,750   $3,500 $1,750   $3,500 $1,750
PERSONAL $     600 $   300 $     600 $   300   $   600 $   300   $       0 $       0
ROOM AND BOARD $  2,400 $1,200 $ 2,400 $1,200   $2,400 $1,200   $2,400 $1,200
TOTAL $11,962 $5,981 $10,730 $5,365   $9,306 $4,653   $7,582 $3,791
                     
 
NOT AT HOME DEPENDENT/INDEPENDENT (D02/I02)
 
  FULL-TIME   THREE-QUARTERS TIME   ONE-HALF TIME   LTH
TUITION AND FEES $  4,362 $ 2,181   $  3,130 $1,565   $ 2,206 $1,103   $1,282 $   641
BOOKS AND SUPPLIES $  1,100 $   550 $  1,100 $   550   $    600 $   300   $   400 $   200
TRANSPORTATION $  3,500 $1,750 $  3,500 $1,750   $ 3,500 $1,750   $3,500 $1,750
PERSONAL $     600 $   300 $     600 $   300   $    600 $   300   $       0 $       0
ROOM AND BOARD $  3,600 $1,800 $  3,600 $1,800   $ 3,600 $1,800   $3,600 $1,800
TOTAL $13,162 $6,581 $11,930 $5,965   $10,506 $5,253   $ 8,782 $4,391