The page uses Browser Access Keys to help with keyboard navigation. Click to learn moreSkip to Navigation

Different browsers use different keystrokes to activate accesskey shortcuts. Please reference the following list to use access keys on your system.

Alt and the accesskey, for Internet Explorer on Windows
Shift and Alt and the accesskey, for Firefox on Windows
Shift and Esc and the accesskey, for Windows or Mac
Ctrl and the accesskey, for the following browsers on a Mac: Internet Explorer 5.2, Safari 1.2, Firefox, Mozilla, Netscape 6+.

We use the following access keys on our gateway

n Skip to Navigation
k Accesskeys description
h Help
   
2017-2018 Chesapeake College Catalog
Chesapeake College
   
 
  Dec 18, 2017
 
 
    
2017-2018 Chesapeake College Catalog

Course Descriptions

Contract All Courses |

 

Accounting

  
  •  

    ACC 103 - Principles of Accounting I

    3 credits
    An introductory course covering the principles, practices, and techniques of accounting. Special emphasis will be placed on analysis and recording of financial transactions and preparation of financial statements. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
  
  •  

    ACC 104+ - Principles of Accounting II

    3 credits
    An introductory course covering corporations and managerial accounting. Financial statement analysis and cash flows will also be emphasized. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 103 .
  
  •  

    ACC 105 - Personal Income Tax

    3 credits
    An analysis of federal taxation. Topics will include federal taxation as it relates to individuals. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
  
  •  

    ACC 106+ - Corporate Tax

    3 credits
    An advanced study of federal taxes. Emphasis will be placed on federal taxes involving corporations and partnerships. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 103 , ACC 105 .
  
  •  

    ACC 110 - Computerized Accounting

    3 credits
    An introductory course covering the use of commercial accounting software. Students will use a hands-on approach to carry out accounting functions on a computer. Topics will include sales, receivables, purchases, payables and payroll. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023   as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    ACC 203+ - Intermediate Accounting I

    3 credits
    An in-depth study of the nature and values of a firm’s cash and temporary investments, receivables, inventories, long-term investments, tangible fixed assets, and intangible assets. Emphasis is given to the measurement of financial income in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 104+ .
  
  •  

    ACC 204+ - Intermediate Accounting II

    3 credits
    An in-depth study of the special accounting problems of corporate organizations. Areas such as stockholder’s equity and long-term debt sections of the balance sheet will be emphasized. Other topics include funds flow, income tax allocation, consignments, installment sales, and financial statement analysis. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 203+ .
  
  •  

    ACC 205+ - Cost Accounting

    3 credits
    A study of cost accounting. Topics include cost accounting fundamentals, budgets and standards, cost allocation, and cost systems. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 104+ .
  
  •  

    ACC 206+ - Auditing

    3 credits
    A study of the audit function. Topics include planning the audit, auditor consideration of internal controls, substantive testing, reporting and audit sampling. Emphasis is also placed on professional ethics and auditor legal liability. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 104+ .
  
  •  

    ACC 212+ - Governmental and Not-For-Profit Accounting

    3 credits
    An introduction to governmental and not-for-profit accounting. Topics include financial reporting, principles of accounting for state and local governments, budgetary accounting, capital project funds, debt service funds, and fiduciary activities. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 104+ .

Agribusiness

  
  •  

    AGR 213 - Introduction to Agricultural Economics

    3 credits
    This introduction to economic concepts related to agriculture includes definition and scope of agricultural economics; business organizations in the food and fiber system; factors of production and their characteristics; location of agricultural production; market equilibrium analysis, and the role of price elasticities of demand and supply. [FALL] Three hours lecture.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    AGR 223+ - Introduction to Agribusiness

    3 credits
    An introduction to agribusiness. The course includes definition and scope of agribusiness, characteristics of agribusiness firms, trends of their expansion/decline are examined, and career opportunities in agribusiness. [SPRING] Three hours lecture.
    Prerequisite(s): AGR 213 .

Agriculture

  
  •  

    AGR 101 - Introduction to Agriculture

    3 credits
    A foundation course in agriculture, covering soil, crop, and environmental sciences, and an understanding of global agricultural systems, modern and historical.  Includes introductory concepts in botany, soil science, pest management, environmental science, nutrient management, agricultural policy, legislation, and sustainability as they apply to food production. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
  
  •  

    AGR 113+ - Soil Science

    4 credits
    Covers the formation, identification, and properties of soils. Additional topics covered include nutrient cycling, organic matter, nutrient management, soil microorganisms, and discussions of different agricultural production systems in the US. [SPRING] Two hours lecture; four hours of laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 121+ 
  
  •  

    AGR 115 - Agricultural Marketing

    3 credits
    An introduction to the shift of agricultural commodities from farm to plate. Topics to be covered include buying, selling, transportation, storage, financing, pricing, and risk bearing. Grain and other commodity markets will also be discussed. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
  
  •  

    AGR 120 - Introduction to the Food System

    3 credits
    An interdisciplinary introduction to the food system:  food science and policy, food marketing and economics, food processing, agriculture, biotechnology, nutrition, eating habits and choices, food security, the connections between consumer demand and food production, and the ethical ramifications of the current food system.  The course will focus on the American food system, but will touch on global food issues, including how to feed an estimated 9,700,000,000 people by 2050. [SPRING] Three hours lecture each week.
  
  •  

    AGR 201 - Agricultural Mechanics

    3 credits
    Introduces the basics of planning, designing, and executing a project. Specific skills learned include drafting, planning, safety procedures, welding, woodworking, and diesel engines. [SPRING] One hour lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
  
  •  

    AGR 214+ - Integrated Pest Management

    3 credits
    An introduction to the practices associated with integrated pest management (IPM), which goes beyond the sole use of pesticides. This course will cover different methods and techniques for pest management. The course will also cover methods for combining these techniques for effective long-term control of pests. [FALL] Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): AGR 113+  
  
  •  

    AGR 220 - Introduction to Animal Science

    4 credits
    A comprehensive overview of the application of biology in the care and use of animals that live in close association with humans, including food animals, companion animals, and zoo animals. The role of science in modern food production using animals will be emphasized. [FALL] Three hours lecture and two hours laboratory each week. Frequent field experiences required.
  
  •  

    AGR 225+ - Organic Crop Production

    4 credits
    Organic farming and gardening methods will be discussed in class and practiced in the field. The philosophical background of organic farming as well as the biological, environmental and social factors involved in organic food production are also covered. [SPRING] Two hours lecture and four hours of laboratory experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): AGR 113+  
  
  •  

    AGR 230+ - Vegetable & Crop Production

    4 credits
    An introduction to vegetable and crop production systems. The course will cover the basics of site selection and establishment, fertilization, irrigation, and harvest of vegetables and other agricultural crops. Major vegetable crops as well as traditional agricultural crops typically grown for human and animal consumption. [SPRING] Two hours lecture and four hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): AGR 113+  
  
  •  

    AGR 240 - Special Topics in Agriculture

    3 credits
    An introduction to, and discussion of, recent and special topics that affect agriculture.  Topics will be drawn from recent technological advances, recent policy changes, and emerging issues in agriculture. [SPRING] Three hours lecture each week.
  
  •  

    SUS 101 - Introduction to Sustainability

    3 credits
    An interdisciplinary introduction to sustainability, challenges faced by humanity as we approach 2100, and practical solutions.  Includes ecological, social, and financial dimensions of sustainability, and draws on concepts from science, policy, economics, ethics, and other academic disciplines.  Includes introductions to systems-level thinking, “wicked problems,” and life-cycle analysis of goods. [FALL] Three hours lecture each week.

Allied Health

  
  •  

    ALH 110 - Phlebotomy I

    5 credits
    A course designed to prepare students for ASPT certification as hospital phlebotomists. Topics covered include: venipuncture theory and techniques, concepts of cardiovascular anatomy, physiology and terminology, and an introduction to standard hospital laboratory tests. The laboratory will focus on venipuncture and collection of blood samples for hematologic testing. [FALL] Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
  
  •  

    ALH 111+ - Phlebotomy Practicum

    2 credits
    Ninety hours of clinical practice in an affiliate clinical facility practicing blood collection techniques. Students must successfully complete a minimum of 150 venipunctures and 25 finger sticks. A total of 90 hours per semester. [SPRING]
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    ALH 110  
  
  •  

    ALH 113+ - Medical Laboratory Assistant

    4 credits
    A course designed to prepare students for work in clinical laboratories as medical laboratory assistants. Basic principles and practices of laboratory medicine are covered. Students are trained to process, under supervision, a variety of laboratory specimens and to perform specified laboratory tests. [SUMMER] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ALH 111+  or students must have a minimum of one year of full-time or two years part-time work experience as a phlebotomist, and/or have completed an approved phlebotomy course. Students must be certified or eligible for certification as a phlebotomist.
  
  •  

    ALH 115+ - Clinical Instruction in the Healthcare Setting

    1 credit
    This course provides guidance to clinical instructors supervising students in healthcare settings. The following skills are covered: assessing the readiness of students to learn, educational theory, goals and objectives, learning and teaching methods, mentoring, feedback, and inculcating critical thinking in student performance. [AS NEEDED] Fifteen hours lecture per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Enrollment is limited to students who are currently licensed, certified, or enrolled in nursing or other allied health programs.

Anthropology

  
  •  

    ANT 142 - Cultural Anthropology

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An objective understanding of the wide variation of human cultures using the scientific method. Students will be involved in analyzing culture and personality, governmental and money systems, language, family organization, religion and other cultural characteristics of society. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take MAT 023   as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Architectural Technology

  
  •  

    ACH 100+ - Architectural Drawing I/CAD

    3 credits
    An introductory course in basic architectural drafting and design using computer-aided drafting techniques. Floor plans, elevations, plot plans and detailed drawings will be prepared. PC-based AutoCAD software is used in this course. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week. [FALL] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 100+ .

Art

  
  •  

    ART 101 - Introduction to Art

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A study of the basic elements of visual form and their application to the richness and variety of art. Traditional and contemporary examples of significant architecture, design, two-dimensional work, and sculpture are examined in relation to the principles by which they may be appreciated. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
  
  •  

    ART 105 - Drawing Fundamentals

    3 credits
    An exploration of concepts and techniques basic to representational drawing. Projects chosen by the instructor will develop skills applicable to still-life, landscapes, interiors, and the human figure. This course is open to students of all levels of experience. [FALL] Four hours lecture/laboratory per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    ART 107 - Drawing: Style and Technique

    3 credits
    An individualized course emphasizing the development of a personal drawing style and technique. This course is open to students of all levels of experience. [SPRING] Four hours per week; combination two hours lecture, two hours studio.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    ART 126 - Painting I

    3 credits
    An introductory course designed to acquaint students with representational means of expression. The emphasis is on basic composition and the successful application of oil paint. [FALL/SPRING] Four hours per week; combination two hours lecture and two hours studio.
  
  •  

    ART 237 - Painting II

    3 credits
    An advanced painting course emphasizing awareness, creative ability,and understanding of formal organization.The techniques necessary for the successful manipulation of oil paint will be also part of this course. [FALL/SPRING] Four hours per week; combination two hours lecture and two hours studio.
  
  •  

    ART 245 - Color and Composition

    3 credits
    A study of the nature, characteristics, and uses of color. Basic color properties are explored and applied to the study of various compositional and design techniques.

      [FALL/SPRING] Four hours per week; combination two hours lecture and two hours studio.

Biology

  
  •  

    BIO 101 - Fundamentals of Biology

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    A study of the basic concepts of living organisms including cell structure and function, metabolism, growth and reproduction, genetics, behavior, adaptation, and evolution for the non-science major. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours of laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BIO 101 and BIO 111+  .  All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 103+ - Preparatory Biology for Healthcare Students

    1 Credit
    A review of the fundamental principles of chemistry including atomic structure, chemical reactions and basic concepts of living organisms including cell structure and function, metabolism, growth and reproduction, and genetics for healthcare students who intend to take BIO 211+ .    Topics provide an understanding of biological systems as a whole. [FALL/SPRING/SUMMER] One hour online lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  and ENG 094+  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement score. 
  
  •  

    BIO 105 - Introduction to Horticulture

    4 credits Meets a General Education requirement
    Covers the principles and practices in the development, production and use of horticulture crops, including classification, taxonomy, structure, growth, development, soils, fertilizers, greenhouse, turf, pest management and environmental influences of horticulture crops. All areas of horticulture will be introduced to the student. [SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 111+ - Principles of Biology I

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    Basic principles of biology with special emphasis on cellular and molecular biology.  This course for biology majors is one of two courses for students who plan to transfer to programs requiring this course as a foundation for further coursework.  Content focuses on providing a framework for understanding how biological components and pathways interact and function by applying principles, techniques, and methods of data analysis to biological problems. The laboratory compliments theory by utilizing the scientific method in experiments to enhance expertise in the use of laboratory equipment.   [FALL/SPRING-AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    MAT 113+  or MAT 115+  or MAT 140+  or receive permission from the Science Department.
    Note: Students cannot receive credit for both BIO 101  and BIO 111.  All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 113+ - Principles of Biology II

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    Basic principles of biology with special emphasis on organismal, ecological, and evolutionary biology.  This course for biology majors is one of two courses for students who plan to transfer to programs requiring this course as a foundation for further coursework. Content focuses on organismal biology, evolutionary diversity of living organisms, behavior and ecological interactions that occur among species. The laboratory complements theory by utilizing the scientific method in experiments to enhance expertise in the use of laboratory equipment. [SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    MAT 113+  or MAT 115+  or MAT 140+  or receive permission from the Science Department.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 202+ - Microbiology

    4 credits
    An introduction to the study of microorganisms. The course includes the study of morphology, classification, and biochemical characteristics of bacteria, fungi, and viruses. Laboratory exercises include identification, staining, growth and control of microorganisms. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 111+  or BIO 211+  or CHM 121+ .
  
  •  

    BIO 204+ - General Botany

    4 credits
    A study of the major groups of plants and emphasis upon those important to society. An evolutionary approach is used to show biological principles of taxonomy, structure, physiology, ecology, adaptation, and population dynamics. [ALTERNATE YEARS - SPRING EVEN] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  or BIO 111+ .
  
  •  

    BIO 206+ - General Zoology

    4 credits
    A study of the major groups of animal and protist kingdoms. Emphasis will include: biological principles of taxonomy, structure, physiology, ecology, adaptation, and population dynamics. [ALTERNATE YEARS - SPRING ODD] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BIO 101  or BIO 111+  or BIO 113+  
  
  •  

    BIO 210+ - Ecological Principles and Environmental Assessment

    4 credits
    Examine the interrelationships between terrestrial and aquatic systems, focusing on field-based investigations. Apply environmental assessment techniques to determine physical, chemical and biological characteristics of a watershed and the factors affecting water quality, flora and fauna. Use Geological Information Systems (GIS) as well as digital meters and Global Positioning Systems (GPS) in the field for data collection. Learn about the factors affecting ecosystem structure and function, including biogeochemical cycles, symbiotic relationships, and the impact of alien species. Investigate the unique characteristics and functions of different ecosystems, including a salt marsh, rocky shore, riparian buffer and coral reef. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Any one of the following courses:   ,   ,   , or   .
  
  •  

    BIO 211+ - Anatomy and Physiology I

    4 credits
    An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. This course is the first of two courses involving a systematic study of homeostatic mechanisms of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems, including special senses. Laboratory study includes cellular biology, histology, and gross anatomy of these systems, with dissection and selected experiments in physiology. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.  Prereq/Corequisite:
    Complete BIO 111+  as a prerequisite or passage of readiness exam or corequisite or take BIO 103+   as a prerequisite or corequisite. 
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 212+ - Anatomy and Physiology II

    4 credits
    An introduction to the structure and function of the human body. This course is the second of two courses involving a systematic study of the cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Homeostasis and endocrine relationships are stressed. Laboratory study includes microscopic and gross anatomy of these systems, with selected experiments in physiology. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.  BIO 211+ .
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 215 - Restoration Ecology

    3 credits
    Learn basic techniques used to repair, restore and create ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on the diverse ecosystems of Maryland. Investigate how water quality is improved through established forest and meadow habitats, tidal and non-tidal wetlands, underwater grass meadows, and dune systems as well as through the construction of rain gardens and vegetated storm water treatment systems. This course does not satisfy a lab science requirement.  [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 253 - Woody Plant Materials I

    3 credits
    Focuses on evergreen trees, shrubs and vines, and plants with distinctive fall color, used in ornamental plantings in the Mid-Atlantic region, as well as significant invasive species.  Evaluating appropriate use of plant species, landscape values, production and maintenance of particular species is emphasized in lecture.  Plant identification is learned in field and laboratory sessions. [FALL] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.  BIO 105  
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BIO 254 - Woody Plant Materials II

    3 credits
    Focuses on spring-blooming and deciduous trees, shrubs and vines used in ornamental plantings in the Mid-Atlantic region as well as significant invasive species. Evaluating appropriate use of plant species, landscape values, production and maintenance of particular species is emphasized in lecture. Plant identification is learned in field and laboratory sessions.  [SPRING] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.  BIO 105  
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Business

  
  •  

    BUS 101 - Introduction to Business

    3 credits
    The role and function of business enterprise within our economic framework. Topics included are organization, finance, marketing, personnel management and production. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 145 - Personal Finance

    3 credits
    An introductory course dealing with the personal financial environment. This course focuses on financial planning needs for contemporary life situations, such as: spending, saving, borrowing and investing decisions. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 160 - Entrepreneurship

    3 credits
    An introductory course into the field of entrepreneurship. The course focuses on the role and nature of entrepreneurship within the global economic environment. Topics will include creating and starting a new business, obtaining financing for the new venture, managing, growing, and ending the organization. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 212+ - Human Resources Management

    3 credits
    An introduction to the principles and practices involved in the effective administration of personnel. The operative functions of recruitment, development, compensation, and job enrichment are emphasized. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 .
  
  •  

    BUS 215+ - Principles of Management

    3 credits
    A survey of basic managerial functions. The course includes the principles, techniques, and concepts needed for managerial decision-making. Planning, organizing, influencing, and controlling functions are all emphasized. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 .
  
  •  

    BUS 220+ - Business Ethics and Society

    3 credits
    An examination of the changing roles of business organizations in society. Topics include business as a socioeconomic institution, business ethics, social responsibility, consumerism, employee relations, equality in the workplace, ecological concerns, media relations, government interface, and community responsibilities. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 101 .
  
  •  

    BUS 230 - Marketing

    3 credits
    An introductory course to the field of marketing. Its purpose is to give a general understanding of the forces operating institutions employ and methods used in the marketing of goods and services. Areas such as advertising, sales promotion, retailing, and wholesaling will be covered. [FALL] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 231 - Salesmanship

    3 credits
    A study of the principles upon which successful personal selling is based. Includes analysis of buying motives, location of prospects, developing the approach, demonstration techniques, handling objections, and closing the sale. A complete sales presentation is required. [SPRING - ALTERNATE YEARS] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 234 - Advertising

    3 credits
    A course emphasizing advertising principles and techniques. Includes the study of advertising media, ethics, social and economic effects of advertising, market analysis, idea creations, and layout principles. [SPRING - ALTERNATE YEARS] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 235 - Retailing

    3 credits
    A survey course designed for those who want to know more about this important business activity. Retail stores and the way they are organized will be considered. Retail buying, selling, advertising, and merchandising will receive special attention. [SPRING - ALTERNATE YEARS] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 240 - International Business

    3 credits
    A study of business operations within an international economic, cultural, and political environment. The student is introduced to exporting and other market entry strategies, foreign exchange, country risk, international marketing, and cross-cultural management. Emphasis is placed on problems and benefits of international business activities. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 241 - Business Law I

    3 credits
    A short history of the development of law, and a description of torts and crimes. Aspects of property, contract, partnership, and agency will be emphasized. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 242+ - Business Law II

    3 credits
    Corporations, sales, and commercial paper will be emphasized. The course includes a discussion of consumer credit, insurance, bankruptcy, the Sherman Act, the Clayton Act, the Robinson-Patman Act, and the Federal Trade Commission. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 241 .
  
  •  

    BUS 245+ - Business Finance

    3 credits
    A study of financial management within the business enterprise. Topics will include a study of financial analysis, planning and control, capital budgeting, cost of capital, leverage, dividend policy, and raising of capital. [SPRING - ALTERNATE YEARS] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): ACC 103  and MAT 110+  or MAT 113+  or MAT 115+  or MAT 204+ .
  
  •  

    BUS 247 - Investments

    3 credits
    An introduction to financial investments. Topics include the different types of securities, financial markets, risks, returns, portfolio theories, institutional investments policies, and global investment opportunities. [AS NEEDED] Three hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 260 - Seminar and Project in Business Management Technology

    3 credits
    This course integrates academic and employment learning with emphasis on financial activities and physical distribution. The classroom projects and interactions, and practical experience will relate to the student’s objectives. [SPRING] One hour lecture, nine hours practicum experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    BUS 261 - Management Prospectus: Production Techniques and Practices

    3 credits
    This course integrates academic and employment related learning, with emphasis upon production techniques and practices. Study includes classroom activities and practical experience. [AS NEEDED] One hour lecture, nine hours practicum experience per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 023  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Cardiac Rescue Technician

  
  •  

    CRT 100+ - Fundamentals of Prehospital Care

    1 credit
    A course defining the primary roles and responsibilities of the Cardiac Rescue Technician–Intermediate. The CRT–I must maintain high-quality, competent, out of hospital care. Primary responsibilities include preparation, response scene assessment, recognition of injuries or illness, management, disposition and documentation while serving as a role model and team leader in the community. The CRT-I must have an understanding of medical/legal issues, accountability, consent, confidentiality, and ethics as they relate to patient care. General information on EMS operations is also taught which includes incident command, triage, and WMD. [FALL] One hour lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 105+ - Patient Care

    1 credit
    A course presenting the foundation of patient assessment. Topics include taking a proper history and advanced physical examination techniques used in the clinical decision-making process. The patient information is disseminated to medical directors in verbal form, directly via radio, and by means of a written report. An overview of human systems and medical terminology are also included. [FALL] One hour lecture per week and eight hours laboratory per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 111+ - Introduction to Clinical

    2 credits
    Introduces the Cardiac Rescue Technician to the clinical environment. This course provides supervised experience at clinical and field internship sites that allows students to practice advanced patient assessment and intervention techniques under the direction of qualified instructors.  [FALL] Minimum of six clinical hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): PREREQUISITE: Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 115+ - Airway Management

    1 credit
    A core knowledge of oxygenation and ventilation is presented. The components covered include anatomy and physiology, utilization of oxygen and oxygen delivery devices. [FALL] Course Fee. One hour lecture per week and eight hours laboratory per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 116+ - Clinical Experience I

    1 credit
    Second clinical course for the Cardiac Rescue Technician student. This course provides supervised experience at clinical and field internship sites that allows students to practice advanced patient assessment and intervention techniques under the direction of qualified instructors. [WINTERIM] Minimum of 15 clinical hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CRT 111+ .
  
  •  

    CRT 121+ - Clinical II

    2 credits
    Third clinical course for the Cardiac Rescue Technician student. This course is designed to allow students to meet all of the clinical competency requirements. The course provides supervised experience at clinical and field internship sites that allows students to practice advanced patient assessment and intervention techniques under the direction of qualified instructors.
    [SPRING] Minimum of six clinical hours per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CRT 116+ .
  
  •  

    CRT 125+ - Pharmacology for the CRT-I

    2 credits
    A study of the basic principles of pharmacology including drug names, sources, classification, forms, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics and drug interactions. The drug profiles of the medications in the EMT-I scope of practice are covered. Psychomotor review includes vascular access and medication administration. [FALL] Course Fee. Two hours lecture per week and eight hours laboratory per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 135+ - Trauma Assessment and Intervention

    1 credit
    The study of kinematics, assessment, shock, and management of the trauma patient are addressed. The patient populations studied include: burns, thoracic, neurologic, abdominal, head, and musculoskeletal injuries. Techniques of airway management, spinal immobilization, vascular access, and extremity immobilization are reviewed. [FALL] One hour lecture per week and eight hours laboratory per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 145+ - Cardiopulmonary Assessment and Intervention

    3 credits
    A study of the pathophysiology of the cardiopulmonary system. Topics include: prevention strategies, assessment, electrophysiology and recognition of disease and injury. Techniques of cardiopulmonary management including cardiopulmonary resuscitation, three and twelve lead electrocardiographic monitoring and interpretation, electrical therapy and pharmacological interventions are covered. [SPRING] Course Fee. Two hours and thirty minutes lecture per week and eight hours laboratory per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 155+ - Medical Assessment and Intervention

    1 credit
    A study of medical disorders. Topics include: diabetic emergencies, anaphylaxis, poisoning and overdoses, neurological emergencies, non-traumatic abdominal emergencies, gynecological emergencies, behavioral disorders and substance abuse. This course will focus on assessment and the development of an appropriate plan of care. Techniques covered will include blood sugar analysis, gastric management, antidote administration, and non-violent crisis intervention. [SPRING] One hour and thirty minutes lecture per week and four hours laboratory per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.
  
  •  

    CRT 165+ - Special Populations: Assessment and Intervention

    1 credit
    A course addressing the specialized assessment and treatments needed for special populations. Topics include: the pregnant patient, neonates, pediatrics, geriatric patients, and patients with special challenges. Techniques include childbirth, neonate resuscitation, weight/length-based interventions, airway management, immobilization, vascular access and medication administration. [SPRING] Course Fee. One hour lecture per week and eight hours laboratory per semester.
    Prerequisite(s): Current certification as a Maryland or Nationally Registered EMT.

Career Planning and Preparation

  
  •  

    CPL 101 - Portfolio Development

    3 credits
    Instruction in developing a portfolio that describes and documents college-level learning gained through non-college experience. Focus is on defining goals, correlating experiential learning with course content, and documenting learning gained through experience. Faculty evaluators assess completed portfolios for a possible award of credit. [AS NEEDED] Three hours per week.
  
  •  

    CPL 105 - Career Planning and Preparation

    1 credit
    A course designed to teach and improve skills necessary to succeed in a career field. Topics will include: career exploration/exposure, core employability skills/workplace competencies, leadership abilities/workplace initiatives, and other related principles. [FALL/SPRING] One hour lecture per week.
  
  •  

    CPL 250+ - Job Shadowing

    1 credit
    A course requiring the student to follow and monitor the work activities of an individual in an actual worksite situation in their field of study. The job shadowing experience is designed to mirror the process used to obtain employment. Students are required to secure their worksite placement. Students will apply for and interview with their potential employer in order to secure their job shadowing worksite. Associated supportive activities related to fundamental business practices will be observed. The purpose is to provide the student with a learning experience that enhances and reinforces the classroom experience. Students will be required to meet for two workshops that will consist of an orientation and final feedback session. The student will also be required to attend an advising session with the instructor midway through the worksite experience. [FALL/SPRING] The work experience will require 50 contact hours at a supervised worksite and three on campus hourly seminars.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    CPL 105 .
  
  •  

    CPL 280+ - Cooperative Work Experience

    3 credits
    Supervised full- or part-time on-site work experience related to the student’s academic study at the College. The cooperative work experience is designed to mirror the process used to obtain employment. Students are required to secure their worksite placement. Students will apply for and interview with their potential employer in order to secure their cooperative experience worksite. The cooperative work experience gives practical application to the student’s classroom learning. Emphasis will be placed upon strong work ethics, functioning as part of a team, critical thinking, and assimilation of classroom learning into the employment experience. [FALL/SPRING] One hour seminar per week and 150 hours per semester at a supervised worksite.
    Prerequisite(s): CPL 105 .
  
  •  

    CPL 281+ - Cooperative Work Experience

    2 credits
    Supervised full- or part-time on-site work experience related to the student’s academic study at the College. The cooperative work experience is designed to mirror the process used to obtain employment. Students are required to secure their work-site placement. Students will apply for and interview with their potential employer in order to secure their cooperative experience work-site. The cooperative work experience gives students practical application to the student’s classroom learning. Emphasis will be placed upon strong work ethics, functioning as part of a team, critical thinking, and assimilation of classroom learning into the employment experience. [FALL/SPRING] One hour seminar per week and 100 hours per semester at the work-site.
    Prerequisite(s): CPL 105 .

Chemistry

  
  •  

    CHM 012+ - Introduction to Chemistry

    0 credits; 4 load hours.
    A foundation in the fundamentals of chemistry and chemical reasoning. This course is intended for students who have not successfully completed one year of high school chemistry or who need to refresh skills in chemistry before registering for certain allied health programs. A practicum involving problem-solving techniques, both mathematical and logical, that are frequently used in chemistry and in the laboratory is included to provide initial exposure to the laboratory setting. [FALL/SPRING] Four hours lecture/practicum per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete MAT 031+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take ENG 094+  as a pre or corequisite, or appropriate placement score.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    CHM 121+ - General Chemistry I

    4 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    An introduction to the fundamental principles of chemistry including atomic structure, chemical reactions and stoichiometry. The laboratory consists of basic techniques and study of chemical reactions. [FALL] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  as a prerequisite, or appropriate placement score. Prereq/Corequisite:
    MAT 113+  or MAT 115+ .
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    CHM 122+ - General Chemistry II

    4 credits
    A continuation of CHM 121+  with major emphasis on chemical kinetics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base and solubility equilibria, redox reactions, electrochemistry, qualitative analysis and the use of computers in chemical studies. The laboratory includes both qualitative and quantitative work. [SPRING] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): You must complete CHM 121+  with a grade of C or higher prior to taking this class.
  
  •  

    CHM 221+ - Organic Chemistry I

    4 credits
    An introduction to the study of organic chemistry, including the physical, chemical structural properties, and the reactions and reaction mechanisms of aliphatic and aromatic compounds. The laboratory consists of the techniques used in the preparation, purification, and classification of typical compounds. Study of the chemistry of carbon compounds and their simple derivatives; including structure, properties, preparation, and typical reaction mechanisms; emphasizing aliphatic and aromatic functional groups. Laboratory work includes general techniques in organic chemistry, synthesis of representative organic compounds, and uses of modern methods of analysis. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): You must complete CHM 122+  with a grade of C or higher prior to taking this class.
  
  •  

    CHM 222+ - Organic Chemistry II

    4 credits
    Continued study of carbon compounds, including reaction mechanisms and syntheses of carboxylic acid derivatives, aldehydes, ketones, amines, and phenols. Life process compounds are introduced. Laboratory work covers modern methods of analysis, including gas chromatography and infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CHM 221+ .

Communication

  
  •  

    COM 101 - Fundamentals of Oral and Organizational Communication

    3 credits | Meets a General Education requirement.
    Foundations of communication theory and practice relevant to individual, small group, and business and professional settings. Major units include theories of communication, interpersonal communication, group discussion (teamwork), organizational culture, diversity, listening, conflict management, interviewing, public speaking and visual aids. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
  
  •  

    COM 160 - Interpersonal Communication

    3 credits
    Individual communication styles and their effects on relationships in personal and work environments. Focus of the course will be on developing awareness of communication techniques and more accurate perception of self and others. The course includes both theory and application of communication strategies in daily interactions. The effects of mediated communication on interpersonal communication will also be explored. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    COM 170 - Introduction to Journalism and News Media

    3 credits
    An introduction to the journalism profession including writing, editing, and production skills required in print, broadcast, online and emerging news media formats. Key units also include the history of journalism, the First Amendment, legal and ethical issues, the media’s influence on culture, developing journalism and public relations practices. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    COM 180 - Introduction to Mass Media

    3 credits
    An introduction to theory, history, structure, and functions of mass media (print, film, recording, radio, television, and multimedia). This course is designed to introduce the students to the historical, cultural, and social implications of modern media. Through case studies, reflection/viewing exercises, and other projects, students are encouraged to engage in critical analysis of the societal, cultural, and technological implications of the mass media industry. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
  
  •  

    COM 201 - Theories of Human Communication

    3 credits
    An introductory survey of theories concerning intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, organizational, public, mass media, and intercultural communication to provide the theoretical bases for further study in communication. This course emphasizes both theory and application to improve skills in critical thinking, observation, and oral and written communication. Course instruction includes lecture, discussion, activities, group work, student presentations, and case studies. [AS NEEDED] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prereq/Corequisite:
    Take  ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as pre or corequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.

Computer-Aided Design

  
  •  

    CAD 100+ - Introduction to CAD

    3 credits
    A study of the fundamentals of computer-aided drafting through the operation of a personal computer using computer-aided design software. Course concepts will include drafting and design, systems storage and retrieval of programs from a disk-operated system, constructing multi-view drawings, and accessing those files to printers and plotters. [SPRING] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): DFT 101 .
  
  •  

    CAD 110+ - Intermediate CAD

    3 credits
    A continuation of CAD 100+  covering such topics as using libraries of pre-drawn materials, producing 3-D drawings, assigning data to graphic symbols, customizing AutoCAD software by creating special screen menus and graphics tablet overlays, and other more advanced applications. [FALL] Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 100+ .
  
  •  

    CAD 250+ - Advanced CAD

    3 credits
    Students will build on their knowledge of CAD with topics to include advanced AutoCAD functions, 3-D modeling, using world and user coordinate systems, and rendering and animating 3-D models. Students will also be introduced to the basic customization capabilities of AutoCAD, including CUI customization, Lisp programming, DCL and VBA programming. [SPRING] Two hours lecture, two hours lab per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CAD 110+ .

Computer Information Systems

  
  •  

    CIS 109 - Introduction to Computers

    4 credits
    A survey of computers and information processing and their roles in society. This course introduces historical perspective, hardware, software, systems and human resources exploring their interaction and application in business and other segments of society. Students will be required to complete lab assignments using the PC’s operating system and several commonly used applications, such as word processors, Internet browsers and search engines, spreadsheets, and graphics presentation applications. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours lecture, two hours laboratory per week.
    Note: CyberWatch curriculum equivalent: CW120. 
  
  •  

    CIS 115 - Microcomputer Applications Integration

    3 credits
    A course in how to utilize and unify all the applications contained within integrated software packages. Exercises will involve business applications using word processing, spreadsheet, database management and presentation software. Considerable hands-on experience will be provided. Good keyboarding skills and experience with use of the Internet, a windowing operating system and file/folder management are necessary for success in this course. [FALL/SPRING] Three hours per week.
  
  •  

    CIS 116 - Social Media Principles

    3 credits
    An exploration of how businesses are using Social Media as communication, advertising, and learning tools as well as how to create and deploy a Social Media Campaign. Additionally, the history and development of Social Medias such as Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and LinkedIn will be explored as well as the many ethical and potential legal concerns that have arisen over these new forms of communication. Finally, the concept of Viral Marketing will be examined and how it allows a Social Message to explode a message to millions of users in a brief time. [FALL] Three hours lecture each week.
  
  •  

    CIS 117+ - Writing for Social Media & Public Relations

    3 credits
    Exploration and development of practical content for diverse forms of Internet communication. Online research, case studies, and class exercises will be used.   Topics include the development of PR contents for all types of web media such as social media sites, blogs, newsrooms, wikis, twitters, website copy, press releases taglines, and virtual worlds.  Material presented includes the role of the interactive writer, thinking interactively, interactive structure, scrip format, flowcharts, and the special challenges of presenting information and stories interactively. [SPRING] Three hours lecture per week.
    Prerequisite(s): CIS 116 ; ENG 101+ 
  
  •  

    CIS 122 - Database Management

    3 credits
    Students learn to design and implement customized database applications in a microcomputer environment. Topics include creation of menu interfaces, use of multiple files and program creation. A current software package will be used to create programs that solve specific database management problems. Good keyboarding skills and experience with the use of the Internet, a windowing operating system, and file/folder management are necessary for success in this course. [FALL] Two hours of lecture, two hours of laboratory per week.
    Prerequisite(s): Complete ENG 094+  and MAT 023  as prerequisites, or appropriate placement scores.
    Note: All developmental courses must be completed with a grade of “C” or better in order to progress to the next developmental level or into college-level courses.
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5


Contract All Courses |